Top ways kids hide their online behavior from parents

Most parents believe they are in control when it comes to teaching a child about the use of digital devices, the Huffington Post reports. The reality is that children are learning at younger ages about technology, and they are largely unsupervised. A recent report said 47 percent of kids ages 8 to 12 years old have a smart phone with internet access. Another study said kids use digital devices more than seven hours a day. In short, kids are using digital devices with internet access most of the time after school and when not sleeping…

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The toll high-stakes tests take on non-traditional learners (and their teachers)

Bobbi Snow reports for The Washington Post: He was already exhausted and had 58 questions to go. On the second problem of the 8th grade math exam he was stuck for almost 30 minutes.  This is the state standardized test given to all 8th graders in Virginia. Jim is a visual learner and needed to draw the answers for each possible option. Pausing a moment Jim reached into his snack bag and announced “Help me out here Pringles.”  Turning to me he commented, “I hear salt helps the brain.” I smiled…

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Think mobile is big now? Here’s proof that it’s just getting started

So, you think that the Mobile Revolution is complete and the battle between smartphones and PCs is all but won? Think again, ReadWriteWeb reports. Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers analyst Mary Meeker’s infamous Internet Trends report dropped today at the AllThingsD D11 conference in Los Angeles. Guess what? Mobile traffic still only makes up 15% of all worldwide Internet traffic. That is less than one-sixth of all time spent on the internet…

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Creating an app programming course for high schoolers

Two of White’s students created their own business and began to pursue careers in software development as a result of the class.

iPad integration specialist Thomas White, who hadn’t written any software code for nearly two decades, was tasked with creating an app programming class for students at his private high school. Here’s how he tackled this challenge.

In April 2010, the iPad went on sale in America. That same day, Stephen Sharp, headmaster at Monte Vista Christian School in Watsonville, Calif., sent out a number of his staff to buy as many iPads as possible, so that he could put them in the classroom without delay—making Monte Vista the world’s first iPad adopter in the K-12 environment. A few months later, he hired me to integrate the technology.

Because we were the first adopters, and because we are close to Apple headquarters, a group of us—board members, administrators, IT staff, teachers, and students—found ourselves being wined and dined on Friday, Sept. 3, 2010, in a very posh room at 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino. In this meeting, I made a mistake that seems to be a recurring personal fault: I spoke before entirely thinking something through.

One of the presenters was talking about an app he had recently built, when I decided to pipe up with a question something along the lines of, “So we’ve got all these great students, and we’ve got these iPads, and we’ve got computer labs. So why don’t we have our students build apps for in-house needs?” As one might imagine, the faces of the Apple executives lit up like Christmas trees. As we were leaving the building, our headmaster turned to me and asked, “So, when are you going to offer that programming course?” That’s when I knew I was in trouble.

(Next page: How White created the app programming course)

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New: 20 facts about teens, Facebook, and Twitter

By now, educators and parents are aware that teens use Facebook and Twitter extensively, but a new study delves deeper into the specifics of how teens are using social media and what the experience means to them.

Conducted by the PEW Internet and American Life Project, the snapshot of teen social media use aggregates data from over 800 surveys of teens in a nationally representative group.

And though it’s common knowledge that issues such as privacy and safety are large concerns for teens when using the internet, some of the statistics from the PEW report, especially when discussing different races and genders, may surprise you.

To read all of the statistics from the report, see “Teens, Social Media, and Privacy.”

(Next page: Facts about teens and social media)

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Prizes of $2,500 plus an iPad Mini

This contest challenges young builders to design & submit a creative, original model made entirely from K’NEX parts and are judged on creativity, uniqueness and detail. The four imaginative children, one winner in each of four age categories, who win will each receive a prize package valued at $3,650. This year, grand prize winners will receive the coolest K’NEXpert prize package yet: $2,500, an iPad Mini, a $250 gift card to Toys “R” Us, and a $500 K’NEX credit code good toward a shopping spree at knex.com. An additional eight finalists will each receive a $250 K’NEX credit code good towards a shopping spree at knex.com, a $100 Toys “R” Us gift card and a K’NEX t-shirt.

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Why millennials are the entrepreneur generation

VatorNews reports that the millenial generation, also known as Generation Y, consists, at least by some, of those born between 1982 and 1993. These are adults from 21 years old to 33. The older Gen Y population didn’t grow up with cell phones or the internet, but by the time they were in their mid-teens, cell phones were small enough to carry around comfortably, and the internet was just starting to commercialize. By the time they were in their mid-20s, they were taking photos with their phones and chronicling their lives on social networks. They were multi-tasking; they weren’t having luck finding jobs; and they were watching the rise of Google, Amazon and Facebook. What’s a kid to do in this environment? Become an entrepreneur…

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