4 reasons why the Common Core Standards are losing popularity


3. Not aligned for college-readiness

A recent report reveals that although most states have adopted the CCSS, their diplomas remain CCSS deficient. Of the 45 states and the District of Columbia that have voluntarily adopted Common Core, only 11 have aligned their graduation requirements in mathematics with those standards. (Read “Report: High school diplomas don’t support Common Core.”)

“They do not require high school graduates to complete the math classes that typically cover the content described in the new standards,” explains the report. “Until states and districts re-examine their graduation policies, a high school diploma will not necessarily signify college- and career-readiness as envisioned by the Common Core.”

4. Stifling creativity

Apart from many questioning the validity of the CCSS’ claims that the new standards will better teach students the skills they need to be college- and career-ready, many in the education sector are worried that the CCSS will become a new No Child Left Behind (NCLB)—turning today’s brightest minds into testing automatons.

“The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise,” explained Marion Brady, a veteran teacher, administrator, curriculum designer, and author in a recent Washington Post article.

Brady said that the CCSS assume that what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. “In fact,” she said, “the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.”

“The word ‘standards’ gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means ‘performance that meets a standard,’” she continued. “However, the word also means ‘like everybody else,’ and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.”

Meris Stansbury

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