Here are some reader responses:

molomo2

April 26, 2013 at 12:54 pm

“This is an excellent list of new apps to try and not a repeat of many of the apps that are already well known by techies. I use Animoto and spring pad and I can say they are all excellent on the pc and I’m glad to see the apps. I like that the android market wasn’t left out because this is the product that the students with lower income can afford first. Androids totally allow you to be flexible.”

heatherrose

May 14, 2013 at 7:20 pm

“This is a great list! Thanks for sharing! I would add Mindsnacks (teaching languages with games–super fun) and The Digits: Fraction Blast, where kids can affect the narrative of a story (rock stars in space!) with their interactions (games, essentially) that teach them fractions. I love both of those!”

cradler

May 31, 2013 at 4:40 pm

“This is an interesting list. What was the criteria that made these ‘the best’ ???”

One commenter asked for more information about apps for post-secondary mathematics, chemistry, and biology. A reader named sue the teacher shared her favorites for math, which include MyScriptCalculator, Geogebra, MathStudio and Statistics, and for science, which a list of science apps.

For special needs students, one commenter provided information for children with print disabilities. She recommended that students read accessible books on the go at http://read2go.org.

While the majority of feedback was positive, some commenters expressed disappointment with the HMH FUSE Algebra 1 app, pointing out that the cost is misleading. Readers cal q lator and hodgecr noted that the app comes with a free demo chapter, but requires a per unit fee. The student home purchase cost is $20 and the school purchase cost is $50.

Thank you for rereading this article and sharing your thoughts. Please look forward to next year’s follow up of the 10 best Apple and Android apps for education in 2014.

For instant updates and breaking news, join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.