To cancel the effects of poverty, school systems are extending literacy programs to the larger community

Mention Napa County, Calif., and what comes to mind for most people are rows of sun-splashed grapes—and well-tanned couples sipping wine under the shade of a vine-covered pergola.

But Napa has its share of poverty, too. More than half of the student population is Latino, and many of these students come from poor households where English isn’t spoken.

“Most of our preschool kids who are native Spanish speakers come to school without anybody having read to them,” said Napa County Superintendent of Schools Barbara Nemko. “Most of...

Subscribe to Read More

Are You an Educator?

Get Free online access to all our
news and resources and get
eSchool News Today email newsletter

About the Author:

The former editor-in-chief of eSchool News, Dennis Pierce is now a freelance writer covering education and technology.