The same game principles from the main Breakout EDU games page apply to these games, but there is no physical component needed other than an internet-connected device, preferably a Chromebook, laptop, or desktop computer. There are 18 digital games available on the Breakout EDU Digital site, with more due to be released on August 21. They range in difficulty from Level 1-10. However, these ratings are subjective, and all the digital games are quite challenging.

In these games, small groups of students search for clues in the form of hidden hyperlinks in images and text on the game webpage. These clues may lead to puzzles that when solved, reveal the combinations to assorted digital locks on the game page. However, there are “red herrings” included in each game that will lead players on a wild goose chase if followed. Students have 45 minutes to use clues found to solve the digital puzzles and find the combinations to all the locks.

A frequent response of teachers watching students working through these games is “total engagement.” In fact, most students are unhappy when time expires as they want to continue working on the puzzles. These games foster a growth mindset as a spirit of resilience is promoted because students use trial-and-error to complete the games.

As the new school year approaches, it is my suggestion that educators visit the Breakout EDU site to familiarize themselves with this exciting and interactive game platform. I highly recommend teachers join the Facebook page, as there is a vibrant and spirited group of game aficionados who share game ideas and links to brand new physical and digital games.

Lastly, I encourage interested teachers to play a few of the digital games themselves (either alone, with family, or other faculty members) to experience it for themselves and to discover some of the great skills their students will be sharpening.
infographic-breakoutBy @MariaGalanis and @sylviaduckworth

Learn more: Breakout EDU Resources

About the Author:

Lee Araoz is a K-12 technology coordinator, instructional coach, staff developer, speaker, and author. He blogs at https://thegoldenageofeducation.com.