2. Focus on professional development for teachers
Our educators complete a teacher “tech trek.” Part of this “tech trek” is to earn their Leading Edge Certification, a nationally recognized certificate for online and blended learning teachers. The “tech trek” includes hours of professional development that helps them learn how to effectively use edtech resources. Our educators also attend conferences such as CUE and ISTE for additional professional development.

The result? I am no longer the only tech expert at my school. We have more than 40 certified educators. That allows us to use professional development time more effectively because we don’t have to spend time on tech basics. We are able to have more deep conversations about what instruction means and what role technology plays in that.

3. Find technology that complements your learning environment
The technology you need depends on your school’s or educators’ teaching practices. What works in one classroom may not work in another. It’s generally a good idea to begin by finding tools that increase student access to teacher knowledge, feedback and instruction.

For example, our teachers use mobile apps such as Notability to annotate and model vocabulary during “think aloud” sessions with students. They discuss word roots and words of the week. Then they use Reflector to wirelessly display mobile devices on the teacher’s computer. Teacher computers are connected to a projector, so the whole class can see what’s happening on the “mirrored” mobile devices.

This combination of educational apps and screen-mirroring software allows the entire class to collaborate. Each teacher or student can share what’s happening on the mobile device in his or her hands with everyone in the room. This creates a sense of community in the classroom, aligns with all of our standards and complements our learning environment.

An important note here: the most popular solution isn’t always going to be the best fit for your school. Do your research to discover what works, tap into your PLN for recommendations and use your educational goals as a guide. Speaking with teachers is always an incredibly enlightening experience for me—it promotes collaboration between educators and the technology team that allows you to more effectively identify solutions and resolve issues.

Long-term adjustments and training
You can begin your tech integration journey using the points I outlined above, but remember that educational philosophies and learning environments are not stagnant. You and your school will need to adapt as technology, leadership and most importantly, student needs, evolve around you.

I would be happy to continue this conversation and hear your ideas on technology integration. You may reach me on twitter @alex_g_ojeda.

About the Author:

Alex Gonzalez is a technology coordinator at Health Sciences High and Middle College in San Diego and coauthor of educational technology publications including Literacy 2.0: Reading and writing in the 21st century (Fisher, Frey, Gonzalez, 2010, Solution Tree) and Teaching with Tablets, How do I integrate tablets with effective instruction? (Fisher, Frey, Gonzalez, 2013, ASCD). Alex holds a Master’s degree from Michigan State University, with a focus on Educational Technology and is currently a doctoral student in San Diego State University’s Educational Leadership program. Alex’s approach focuses on purposefully integrating technology with pedagogical and content strengths.