Being well-versed in literature means to be able to use the power of imagination to support and describe the essence of the subject. This is where the task can get tricky. Oftentimes the learners fail to understand the vocabulary of the book that sets the obstacles for the reading comprehension, or fail to discuss the topic because they lack active vocabulary.

In order to make students discuss the learned material in the class, it is important to provide them with encouragement and help that gives a good stimulus to learn and discover more.

The classroom can be a perfect ground for discussions, imagination training, and language improving activities. These app essentials will help keep high school students engaged while learning language arts, and teach them how to form the arguments and enhance learning comprehension.

Forming the Arguments

The idea is the main component in argument forming, and actively learn teaches students how to communicate by asking and answering questions.

Actively Learn is an online interactive platform where students learn through “layers”–the discussion questions that structure readings. This is a collaborative space where students can ask a question that concerns them, discuss their own vision with others, and share ideas considering the reading material.

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As the students ask, answer, edit, and share the annotations right inside the text, the teachers can monitor their activities and make learning suggestions. The unique aspect of the app is that it not only encourages active reading, but also the active thinking process as students consider questions after reading.

Engaging the Reading

Newsela is a daily updated news-as-literacy platform accumulating articles on History, Science, Health, Law, and Arts. Newsela is a good app to use if you want to boost cross-curricular reading, but it can also be good for the classroom.

Selecting the appropriate reading level, the teacher can assign individual readings to the student or the group. As the students progress through the reading assignments, they also go through quizzes and write a quick prompt to the passage they’ve just read.

The workflow in Newsela gives a basis for independent classroom reading, as it also has a built-in dictionary and translator for when students encounter unknown or unfamiliar words.

(Next page: Language arts apps to avoid plagiarism, develop critical thinking and extend vocab)

About the Author:

Nancy Lin is an enthusiastic school teacher from Kansas City.