In the industrial setting, Industry 4.0 is a term that analysts use to describe the automation and data exchange that are used in manufacturing technologies, and this involves modern concepts like the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing, and other innovations. Cumulatively, these technologies are changing the face of manufacturing.

Much like a manufacturing firm needs a flexible production line in order to adapt to changes in demand and customer preferences, education must also be tailor-made in a way that truly prepares students for success. In order to effectively implement Education 4.0, these five myths will have to be debunked:

Myth #1: Students are just “empty vessels.”
During the second industrial revolution, many believed that a student’s brain is similar to a piece of raw material that is assembled from scratch into a perfect product. In fact, the brain was referred to as an empty vessel, a blank slate that teachers poured knowledge into. We assumed that students lacked knowledge, and the teacher filled their brains with knowledge—building the same knowledge structure for all students (i.e., constructivism).

5 modern education myths debunked #k12

But this isn’t true. Students have prior knowledge that is accumulated differently by each student. Knowledge is not created like an assembly-line product. Students must be encouraged to experiment and take on real-world problem solving to create more knowledge and understanding for themselves and then to reflect on and talk about their activities.

About the Author:

Ido Yerushalmi has been the chief executive officer of Intelitek Inc. since 2014. Based in Intelitek’s New Hampshire headquarters, Yerushalmi is leading Intelitek through the changes in the education market, addressing advanced vocational and career training worldwide while developing STEM programs for middle and high school.


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