What’s Cyberbullying? (Grades 3–5)
What is cyberbullying, and what can you do to stop it?

Students recognize similarities and differences among in-person bullying, cyberbullying, and being mean through whole-class discussion and a partner pair-share activity. They empathize with the targets of cyberbullying as they read and discuss a specific cyberbullying scenario. Then they identify strategies for dealing with cyberbullying and ways they can be an upstander for those being bullied.

Cyberbullying: Be Upstanding (Grades 6–8)
How do you judge the intentions and impact of people’s words and actions online?

Students learn about the difference between being a passive bystander versus a brave upstander in cyberbullying situations. Students reflect on what it means to be brave and to stand up for others. They fill out the “Why Care?” student handout, create a diagram of the players involved, and generate ideas about how bystanders can become upstanders. They then identify concrete solutions for dealing with cyberbullying situations.

Taking Perspectives on Cyberbullying (Grades 9–12)
How does online cruelty affect the people involved?

Students learn about the dynamics of online cruelty and how it affects all the people involved. Students begin by exploring a scenario from the TV show Friday Night Lights, in which a teen girl creates a hate website about another girl. Students take the perspective of different characters and brainstorm alternative decisions each character could have made. Finally, students discuss what actions they can take when they encounter online cruelty in their own lives, including how to be an upstander.

 [Editor’s note: This post originally appeared on Common Sense Education.]

About the Author:

Bronwyn Harris is an author, educator, and editor living in the East Bay. She is originally from Petaluma, California, and began her teaching career in 2000 in the most violent neighborhood in Oakland, California, and has since written a book about her experiences: Literally Unbelievable: Stories from an East Oakland Classroom. Harris has written for Teaching Tolerance and AlterNet, among others.