Impact of transformation

The NCHS library is used every period as classroom space, and students with free periods stop by to create in the makerspace. In the first year, the makerspace became a popular location for students to build dioramas, monster trucks, and child development sensory boards. However, it did not get much attention from teachers until that summer when NPR posted the NCHS makerspace edWebinar about a year in the life of a makerspace on its Facebook page. NCHS teachers began to explore the makerspace and the start of the second year brought more teachers and classes to the makerspace for whole-class making.

At end of year three, when Luhtala and Burns saw that coding, robotics, and circuitry workshops were a little bit elusive, they started experimenting with augmented and virtual reality and robotics. With a new “techxperts” one-credit course, students are empowered with leadership through independent projects and are running well-attended lunchtime workshops. One techxpert created a website that demonstrates coding and robotics resources for the classroom. This student-designed website communicates to the school community how the makerspace resources can be integrated into their curriculum.

Luhtala said that teachers are now bringing their classes to the makerspace with very intentional goals and revamping and redesigning classroom projects with high- and low-tech options. She emphasized that if a student or teacher is attracted to a makerspace idea, it is critical to feed that interest because it is usually a minimum investment and may spark the attention of other makerspace enthusiasts.

About the Presenters

Michelle Luhtala is the library department chair at New Canaan High School in Connecticut and was one of five school librarians named as a “Mover and Shaker” by Library Journal in 2015. She is the winner of the 2011 “I Love My Librarian” Award and the Library Association’s 2010 Outstanding Librarian Award. The New Canaan High School Library won AASL’s National School Library Program of the year in 2010. Follow her on Twitter @mluhtala.

Donna Burns began her career in the East Haven (CT) Public Schools as an integrated language arts teacher. Next, she served several roles in the Bethel (CT) Public Schools including library media specialist, administrative intern, K-12 coordinator of computer science and library media, and social studies curriculum coordinator. Currently, Burns is a technology integrator and web content manager at New Canaan High School in Connecticut. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from Southern Connecticut State University and a Master of Science degree in instructional technology from Western Connecticut State University. In addition, she attended Sacred Heart University where she completed the Educational Leadership program and earned an Intermediate Administrator Certification and Certificate of Advanced Study in Administration.

How to transform a library into a #makerspace

Join the Community

Emerging Tech for Schools and Libraries is a free professional learning community on edWeb.net where school librarians, teachers, and administrators can explore all the ways to integrate technology and 21st century learning into school library programs.

This edWeb broadcast was sponsored by Mackin Educational Resources. The recording of the edWebinar can be viewed by anyone here.

[Editor’s note: This piece is original content produced by edWeb.net. View more edWeb.net events here.]

About the Author:

Eileen Belastock, CETL is the director of academic technology for Mount Greylock Regional School District in Williamstown, Mass. You can follow her on Twitter @EileenBelastock.


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