For 250 years, Encyclopaedia Britannica has provided the world with researched, verified information. A global leader in education whose flagship products serve the needs of students and consumers on multiple platforms and devices, Britannica has been a pioneer in digital learning since the 1980s.

eSchool News has partnered with Britannica to bring you a fun fact each month, along with advice on how to teach today’s students how to cut through the misinformation on the internet.

Why do tennis players wear white at Wimbledon?

The Wimbledon Championships are the oldest and most prestigious of the four tennis Grand Slam tournaments. As such, Wimbledon is awash in long-lasting traditions, the most famous perhaps being the all-white (or predominantly white) dress code for all participants. How did this come about?

Fast fact: Why do tennis players wear white at Wimbledon?

How to differentiate fact from fake

In 2018 Britannica established a partnership with YouTube as just one of our initiatives to help users cut through the Internet clutter and find reliable information.Today visitors to YouTube will have a new and easier way to get more information about certain topics. Encyclopaedia Britannica will provide custom, fact-checked information on certain historical and scientific topics that have been subject to misinformation, and YouTube will link to this information from Britannica in searches and below videos about these topics.

An example of the coverage Britannica will provide includes a feature on the 2014 disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17. YouTube is starting with a small number of topics, which will be displayed for users in the United States, and slowly rolling out this feature more broadly in the coming months. In addition to Britannica’s in-depth coverage of the subject, YouTube users visiting http://www.britannica.com/ will get additional information developed specially for them. Try it out to see how you can more easily access verified, trusted information.

About the Author:

Kate Lohnes (Kathleen Kenedy Lohnes) was an editorial intern at Encyclopaedia Britannica in 2017 and 2018. She attends the University of Iowa, intending to graduate in May 2020 with a bachelor’s degree in creative writing with minors in philosophy and studio arts. She is also the author of a collection of self-published poetry entitled Stockholm Syndrome 17 (2016).


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