Check out these engaging podcasts for kids--your students might benefit from a new way to discover new topics and ideas

8 awesome podcasts for kids, families, and teachers


Check out these engaging podcasts for kids--your students might benefit from a new way to discover new topics and ideas

3. But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids: But Why is a show led by you, kids! You ask the questions and we find the answers. It’s a big interesting world out there. On But Why, we tackle topics large and small, about nature, words, even the end of the world.

4. Book Club for Kids: Book Club for Kids is a free, 20-minute podcast devoted to middle grade books and readers. Each show features a trio of students discussing a favorite book, an interview with the author, and a celebrity reading.

5. Brains On!: Brains On! is an award-winning audio show for kids and families. Each week, a different kid co-host joins Molly Bloom to find answers to fascinating questions about the world. Our mission is to encourage kids’ natural curiosity and wonder using science and history…but there’s no age limit on curiosity and episodes of Brains On can be enjoyed by anyone.

6. The Emotion Motion Podcast: The Emotion Motion Podcast takes listeners on a journey through storytelling designed to engage children, their families, and their teachers in movement and creative expression. Weekly episodes include opportunities to put your emotions in motion through play and movement while practicing skills like empathy, self-awareness, regulating emotions, mindfulness, and more.

7. Brain Stuff: Whether the topic is popcorn or particle physics, you can count on BrainStuff to explore–and explain–the everyday science in the world around us.

8. The Past and the Curious: If there’s one thing we know, it’s that you can have fun and still take history seriously. The Past and The Curious honors the good, shoots straight about the bad, and shares true stories from the past that surprise, inspire, and delight us all. Each episode is filled with important personalities, technological advancements, social movements, cultural references, music, and humor. Some might call it cultural literacy but we call it making the past come alive.

Laura Ascione
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