As popularity and usage of digital tools rises, it's important to know what, exactly, makes a good digital math tool with a laptop and calculator.

What makes a good digital math tool?


As popularity and usage of digital tools rises, it's important to know what, exactly, makes a good digital math tool

Q2: Based on what you’re hearing in your own work at Texthelp, as well as from others in the industry, what have users–teachers or students–highlighted as benefits of digital math tools? 

A: The main benefit of digital math tools is that they make math accessible to everyone. Students are able to express themselves using multiple types of input (speech, handwriting, and typing), which enables them to focus on the concepts rather than creating the math. There’s also a huge benefit for vision-impaired users, offering alternative ways of representing and hearing math. This removes a barrier that existed with paper-only resources.

Q3: What are the keys to developing a digital math tool for students and educators? 

A: To put it frankly, simplicity and the understanding that everyone learns differently. Math is a complex and far-reaching subject, but creating digital math doesn’t have to be difficult. Keeping the tools simple and user-friendly for students, educators, and those with accessibility needs ensures that everyone can express themselves. It also ensures that the digital tool won’t be a hindrance to learning or instruction.

Q4: From your point of view, what does the future of math education look like now that teachers and students are becoming accustomed to using digital tools for the subject? Are there any technologies you think will have a big impact on the teaching and learning of the subject in the future? 

A: Now that teachers and students are becoming more familiar with these tools, I think more and more math lessons, assessments, and homework will happen digitally. Teachers have seen how much time they can save using these tools and, more importantly, how they can get meaningful and constructive feedback to their students in near real-time.

From a technology standpoint, I think machine learning and AI will play a big part in both the teaching and learning of math in the future as well. In the assessment space, in particular, its use could help teachers save time grading assessments. In remote learning scenarios, it could provide instructional support to students at home struggling with a particular math problem or without one-to-one support.

Laura Ascione
Latest posts by Laura Ascione (see all)

Want to share a great resource? Let us know at submissions@eschoolmedia.com.