Daily lessons and activities for K-5 students

In response to school closures across the country, hand2mind is launching a new website teach@home: Daily Lessons & Activities for K–5 Students, which will offer a series of free daily lessons and activities created and delivered by teachers.

Each week, teach@home will provide:

  • An easy-to-follow schedule, by grade, for kindergarten through 5th-grade students;
  • Daily, grade-specific, teacher-delivered video lessons for Math and Literacy, including content in Spanish;
  • Worksheets for the Math and Literacy lessons; and
  • Daily Specials activities including Art, STEM, Social Emotional Learning, and more.

Each daily video is around 10 minutes long and paired with worksheets and activities to further student comprehension and engagement.…Read More

Free videos to support at-home learning during school closings

Ringbeller, an education media company dedicated to helping kids develop 21st-century skills like creativity, collaboration, and kindness, has released five episodes of its “edutainment” video content, designed for students in kindergarten through fifth grade, on the Ringbeller Youtube Channel. Described as “TED meets Mr. Rogers,” the content is part of Ringbeller’s subscription platform already in use in classrooms across the U.S. but is now being made available online, free of charge, to support students’ at-home learning while schools across the nation are closed due to the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) pandemic.

Ringbeller was created by entrepreneur and media producer CJ Casciotta, author of the book Get Weird: Discover the Surprising Secret to Making a Difference. Casciotta has collaborated on projects with MGM Studios, Sesame Studios, The United Nations Foundation, Whole Foods and more. A sought after communicator and TEDx alumnus, he’s traveled around the world inspiring communities like Lululemon, Creative Mornings and Charity: Water with his message that creativity and kindness, when combined, are the skills that ultimately move culture toward the kind of future we imagine. His work has been featured by Forbes, Salon, CBS, MTV and Publishers Weekly.

“Students and their families are facing an unprecedented challenge right now, with widespread and indefinite school closings becoming ‘the new normal’ nationwide. We want to do our part to ensure kids have access to resources that will support continued learning while they are out of school, so we’ve decided to make five Ringbeller videos available on Youtube, where they are accessible to all kids and their parents,” said Casciotta. “We have also created new supplemental activities for families to work on together as they reflect on the skill-building lessons in our edutainment content. We hope students will not only have an opportunity to continue developing their social-emotional skills but truly enjoy participating in these lessons at home.”…Read More

Teacher training does wonders for students’ emotional regulation

When teachers participated in a training program focused on pro-social classroom behavior, their students became more socially competent and better able to regulate their emotions than students in classrooms without trained teachers, according to new research from the University of Missouri (MU).

Past research shows that students who are able to regulate their emotions are more likely to be academically successful.

Wendy Reinke and Keith Herman, professors in MU’s College of Education, studied more than 100 teachers and 1,817 students from kindergarten to third grade to see if teachers could support students’ emotional and behavioral growth through the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program.…Read More

Why combining assessments and LMS technology is essential

Assessments are more than just measuring how well students are doing in particular subjects in school, and they can actually improve student learning. In fact, frequent assessments can have a positive impact on a student’s education from kindergarten through college. While this may make some educators cringe, the reality is that test-enhanced learning, or testing as an aid to learning, has evidence of effectiveness dating back nearly 100 years (Roediger III, McDaniel, & McDermott, 2006).

Testing can help students better retain and recall what they studied, not only for the final exam, but as part of their overall educational development. This is the “testing effect,” or the phenomenon where taking a quiz can enhance later retention of studied materials, and its effectiveness has been demonstrated many times over. Students who take quizzes shortly after they study show better performance on a final test relative to students who only study without taking a practice quiz, even when no feedback is given on the quiz (Roediger III, McDaniel, & McDermott, 2006).

The testing effect, also known as retrieval practice, practice testing, or test-enhanced learning, needs a place in today’s modern learning. It can be implemented in modern learning management system (LMS) and assessment management system (AMS) technologies, like Gauge, to help improve student learning, from their first day in kindergarten to their last day of earning a university degree.…Read More

New partnership to promote the 16 Habits of Mind

ASCD, in partnership with Wonder Media, presents a series of animations based on the renowned 16 Habits of Mind developed by Dr. Art Costa and Bena Kallick of the Global Institute for Habits of Mind. This groundbreaking collaboration offers a unique tool that empowers students in kindergarten through 2nd grade with creative and critical thinking skills for success in school and life.

The Habits of Mind Animations offer educators a revolutionary new tool in alignment with college- and career- ready standards to help students learn how to persist, how to manage their impulsivity, how to listen with understanding and empathy, how to strive for accuracy, and 12 other essential life skills.

Research shows that young children form strong emotional relationships with animated characters, and using these characters to model behaviors helps break down barriers to students’ understanding of difficult-to-teach concepts.…Read More

15 of the best apps to engage students outside the classroom

Learning shouldn’t stop when students leave for summer vacation. Rather, this extended break from the classroom is the perfect time to introduce kids to a variety of mobile apps that can continuously promote creativity and critical thinking. From kindergarten to grade 12, the vast assortment of digital offerings can meet any student’s interests, all while providing valuable lessons that will appropriately challenge each user. Here are a few great options for rainy days, road trips or any time in between.

Grades K-5: (in no particular order)

Osmo introduces children to hands-on play through the iPad. With its offerings, like Newton, Masterpiece and Coding, kids use physical manipulation to navigate a variety of digital activities. Once they master one skill, they can move on to more challenging options.…Read More

If you give a kindergartner a Chromebook…

Although even the youngest children are considered tech-savvy today, there exists a difference between a child who knows how to use a tablet to watch videos and a child who knows how to navigate a device for active learning.

The thought of giving 30 kindergarten students their own Chromebooks might be daunting. But for one classroom, the move yielded some surprising results for student engagement, learning progress, and for students with special needs.

“We had surprising outcomes from students with special needs,” said Jamie Morgan, an elementary school teacher in the Wichita Falls ISD in Texas. In her classroom, she had students with ADHD, ODD, autism, visual disabilities, intellectual delays, and gifted and talented students. “Chromebooks made it really, really easy to differentiate instruction–I can’t imagine doing the differentiation that needed to be done without having the Chromebooks,” she said.…Read More

DoE compiles new report on using tech with young learners

When it comes to using technology with the youngest learners, educators have tried for years to strike a balance between what kinds, if any, and how much.

Now the federal departments of Education and Health and Human Services are throwing in their two cents with the release of a new policy brief on the subject, which advocates active, meaningful, and socially interactive learning for kids up to eight years old.

The brief is intended as a helpful resource for educators and others caring for young children, but is also directed at researchers and technology developers, highlighting topics for further research and encouraging the development of research-based products.…Read More

Who are the educators driving flipped learning?

Educators searching for flipped learning inspiration can now find it in a list of 100 people who are innovating and inspiring others in their pursuit of flipped instruction.

The Flipped Learning Global Initiative (FLGI), a worldwide coalition of educators, researchers, technologists, professional development providers and education leaders, published the FLGI 100, an annual list identifying the top 100 innovative people in education who are driving the adoption of the flipped classroom around the world.

The list is compiled by the FLGI executive committee, led by Jon Bergmann, one of the leaders of the flipped classroom movement. The FLGI 100 list includes flipped learning researchers, master teachers, technology coaches, literacy specialists, math and science experts and educators from kindergarten to higher education.…Read More

Utah’s early literacy program works–here’s why

Latest evaluation of statewide early literacy program shows high correlation with kindergarten readiness compared to control group

A statewide kindergarten readiness initiative in Utah is helping children develop early literacy skills before they enter kindergarten, and is doing so at a higher rate than among children who are not in the program.

The state’s UPSTART program, developed by the nonprofit Waterford Institute, uses an early literacy curriculum delivered digitally in the home.

A report analyzing the program’s fifth year suggests that technology has considerable merit for delivering curriculum, teaching critical early reading skills that are known predictors of later school performance, and closing early learning gaps that disproportionately affect disadvantaged children.…Read More