Cornell will not ban the iPad

Contrary to media reports, Cornell is not experiencing bandwidth problems as a result of iPad use on campus, reports the Cornell Daily Sun. Though Princeton and George Washington University have banned the use of some iPads, Apple’s newest handheld touch-screen device, because of possible security issues, Cornell has not taken such measures, according to Dave Vernon, director of information technology. The Wall Street Journal reported late last week that Cornell was experiencing problems with connectivity and that it feared it would experience bandwidth overload as a result of the iPad. The story, which also noted that Princeton and George Washington had banned iPad use, was picked up by a number of technology blogs. Vernon maintained that these reports about a Cornell iPad ban were untrue. “We have researched the issue and have found no negative impact at Cornell at this time,” he stated in an eMail message. The iPad is currently on sale at the Cornell Store, and users have been able to operate the device successfully on campus…

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iPad too much for some campus networks

The New York Times reports that the iPad has been touted as the next big thing in higher education technology, especially as more textbooks make the digital conversation, but according to a Wall Street Journal report, not all college campus networks can handle the mobile tablets. George Washington University students and faculty members who sprung for an iPad can’t access the campus wireless network. Princeton University has blocked about two dozen iPads that were messing up the university network. Seton Hill University, which is equipping every student with an iPad, has had to quadruple its bandwidth and charge students a $500-per-semester technology fee. Cornell University is also seeing networking and connectivity issues, similar to what happened with the iPhone hit…

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Education gains shield women from worst of job woes

Steady increases among women with college degrees over the past two decades apparently have paid off during the recession, with government statistics showing they fared better than men over the past year, and for the first time surpassed the number of men holding payroll jobs, reports the Wall Street Journal. Women were earning about 166 associates degrees and 135 bachelor’s degrees for every 100 earned by men in 2007, according to the U.S. Department of Education. More women were employed in teaching, government and health care, sectors that held up better in the recession. The construction and manufacturing sectors, which often require less schooling, have shed millions of jobs in the last few years. Revised data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed women held about 720,000 more nonfarm payroll jobs than men in January. They also exceeded the number of men on the payroll during four months last year.

“This is unprecedented,” said Tim Consedine, regional economist,at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in Boston.

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Textbook firms ink e-deals for iPad

Major textbook publishers have struck deals with software company ScrollMotion Inc. to adapt their textbooks for the electronic page, as the industry embraces a hope that digital devices such as Apple‘s iPad will transform the classroom, reports the Wall Street Journal. The publishers are tapping the know-how of ScrollMotion to develop textbook applications and test-prep and study guides for the iPad. “People have been talking about the impact of technology on education for 25 years. It feels like it is really going to happen in 2010,” said Rik Kranenburg, group president of higher education for the education unit of McGraw-Hill Cos. and one of the publishers involved in the project. Other publishers include Houghton Mifflin Harcourt K-12, Pearson PLC’s Pearson Education, and Washington Post Co.’s Kaplan Inc., known for its test-prep and study guides. Many developers and publishers are working on applications that will work on the iPad and other digital devices. Maureen McMahon, president of Kaplan Publishing, said a recent Kaplan study showed that students remain big fans of printed books but that they would be more receptive to e-textbooks on portable digital devices. Whether the iPad will be the digital device to transform the classroom remains to be seen. “Nobody knows what device will take off, or which ‘killer app’ will drive student adaptations. Today they aren’t reading e-textbooks on their laptops. But ahead we see all kinds of new instruction materials,” said Kranenburg…

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