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Classroom security: What you should (not) do

There are many ways to lock a classroom door. Unfortunately, too many of the tactics employed today actually put staff and students at risk

classroom-school-security

Safe School Week will be a national observation during the third week in October (Oct. 19-25).

One study, “On the Importance of a Safe School and Classroom Climate for Student Achievement in Reading Literacy,” reported that variation between classes’ reading achievement could be explained by safety factors—with these factors significantly and positively impacting achievement.

Additionally, “Too Scared to Learn? The Academic Consequences of Feeling Unsafe at School,” reports that a safe environment is a prerequisite for productive learning. Findings showed that if students feel unsafe in the classroom, they are less able to concentrate in class and perform well on assessments. In addition, students who report feeling unsafe in the classroom have higher mean absences and lower scores on the math and English language arts standardized tests.

Thus, beyond potential harm, student safety is an extremely important topic. And, classroom security is as critical to the safety of students and staff as is perimeter access into a school. Every school should meet or exceed the baseline of classroom security for products and protocol.

There are many ways to lock a classroom door. Unfortunately, too many of the tactics employed today actually put staff and students at risk. It’s important for school administrators and parents to know which methods are effective and which should be avoided.

(Next page: Baseline classroom security options)

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