With summer break on the horizon, it’s more important than ever to not only better help struggling readers in the classroom, but understand what helps them improve and want to read when they’re at home.

More than 10 million American students struggle to read, but only 2.3 million are identified and even fewer receive special help; therefore, schools must provide support for struggling students by creating a culture of reading. In “45 Ways to Support Struggling Readers: A School-Wide Approach,” hosted by edWeb.net and sponsored by Learning Ally, Terrie Noland, Learning Ally National Director, Educator Engagement; and Kristy Mathieu, Kiker Elementary, Austin, TX, presented tips for how schools can support struggling readers in the classroom and at home.

Here are 5 of those tips (for more tips, click on the link at the bottom of the article for the full webinar):

1. Provide Students with a Comfortable Place for Reading

Mathieu implemented flexible seating into her classroom, which allows students to sit in a more relaxed environment as opposed to sitting in rows. Seats that allow for natural movement, such as stools that move, are also helpful for children with attention issues.

2. Give Struggling Readers a Fidget Object

Mathieu even provides toys for students to fidget with while reading, like putty, because some struggling readers may become anxious while trying to read. Kristy commented on her classroom setup, “It doesn’t matter to me where you’re working—as long as you’re working.”

(Next page: Tips for struggling readers 3-5)


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