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Integrating STEM in the elementary years: Your lesson plans may already hold the answer

It's easy to turn classroom lessons into engineering lessons.

It's easy to turn classroom lessons into engineering lessons.

Are you a teacher searching for ways to teach engineering in your elementary classroom, but want to start simple and are not quite sure how to begin?  Well, the answer may already be in your lesson plans.

As the mom of two elementary students, author of a children’s book about engineering, and an engineer, I have witnessed several of my children’s class projects that, with the addition of a sentence or two, become an engineering project.  When I can, I offer the teachers a few grade-level-appropriate sentences that relate the project to engineering.

Engineering Basics

Engineers do many different things, but the basic elements of the engineering method are generally the same:
•    brainstorming
•    planning
•    creating
•    modifying
•    team problem solving

Do any of these attributes sound familiar?  Take a look at your lesson plans–I bet you could find several projects involving at least one or two of the above listed attributes.

To help spur ideas of how you can modify your current lesson plan projects to engineering-related ones, I’ve included examples of two kindergarten projects from my daughter’s class and one second grade project from my son’s science class.  All of these projects were developed as fun teaching tools–and that is what makes them such fun engineering projects!

Gingerbread traps

“Run, run as fast you can! Can’t catch me, I’m the Gingerbread man!”

Those words swirled around the room as my daughter’s kindergarten teacher announced the start of gingerbread trap building. Students were allowed to choose working alone or as part of a team, and they could choose members of their team (or teams as some children migrated, joyfully sharing their ideas.)  For these young students, allowing them to choose team or individual work was essential for their enjoyment and the ultimate success of the project.

Excitement was high as kindergartners brainstormed, innovated, and built traps to catch their wayward gingerbread cookies.  Their vivid imaginations were given free reign to use any materials they found in the room–blocks, Legos, paper, connecting sticks, boxes, etc.

In the end, there were about 10 traps total–each very different from the next, yet all as effective. When the kindergartners returned from story time, they were delighted to see their gingerbread caught in the traps they built (with a little extra help from me and another teacher).  Success and joy–the traps worked just as they imagined and designed!
Their first project as gingerbread trap engineers left them with bellies full of tasty gingerbread cookies.

A great way to introduce this project as an engineering one could be:

“Today, you will be Gingerbread Trap Engineers. Your mission–create and build a trap big enough to catch our missing gingerbread cookies. Your materials–any of the items on the carpet or art table. Good luck, and begin building.”
Ice Cream Sundaes

Two days later, these same kindergartners tested their critical thinking skills on an “Ice Cream Sundae assembly line.”  With moving paper as the conveyor belt and lots of tasty goodies lined up on both sides of the table, each student had an important “job” to do as part of their contribution to the end product–big bowls of ice cream sundaes loaded with goodies.

As ice cream sundae process engineers, they learned the importance of process layout, timing, and function, as well as coordinating as a team.  Once again their little bellies were rewarded with the sweets of their labor–in record time and best of all, no waiting for anyone!

Transform this project into an engineering activity with open-ended discussion questions such as:

“What do you think our sundaes would have looked like if we had started with the sprinkles and ended with scoops of ice cream?”

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Comments:

  1. mfiner

    April 6, 2010 at 2:27 pm

    Patty, I like how you have taken lessons already used and showing how to link it to engineering practices. However, it is important to add that the “T” in STEM is an integral part of those three lessons you mentioned. The first one, gingerbread traps, uses the engineering process of designing, then uses the technology portion of STEM, using “tools, materials and processes”. In this case probably scissors, glue paper clips paper towel rolls etc. The second unit, ice cream sundaes, revolves around the manufacturing process. This is one of the six areas of technology education as defined by the ITEEA (International Technology Engineering Educators Association). The last lesson talks about engineers asking “what will happen if x, y or z is done”. This is where the technology part of STEM takes over in the reconstruction of the materials.
    It is very important for all involved that we don’t just think of the T in STEM as computers. It is also very important not to forget that with every great piece of technology, i.e. the Hubble Telescope, a group of engineers designed it, however they did not build it nor do they maintain it. This is done by skilled technologists, the tradesmen and women who must be educated in STEM curriculum as well.
    Marc Finer
    Littleton, Colorado

  2. mfiner

    April 6, 2010 at 2:27 pm

    Patty, I like how you have taken lessons already used and showing how to link it to engineering practices. However, it is important to add that the “T” in STEM is an integral part of those three lessons you mentioned. The first one, gingerbread traps, uses the engineering process of designing, then uses the technology portion of STEM, using “tools, materials and processes”. In this case probably scissors, glue paper clips paper towel rolls etc. The second unit, ice cream sundaes, revolves around the manufacturing process. This is one of the six areas of technology education as defined by the ITEEA (International Technology Engineering Educators Association). The last lesson talks about engineers asking “what will happen if x, y or z is done”. This is where the technology part of STEM takes over in the reconstruction of the materials.
    It is very important for all involved that we don’t just think of the T in STEM as computers. It is also very important not to forget that with every great piece of technology, i.e. the Hubble Telescope, a group of engineers designed it, however they did not build it nor do they maintain it. This is done by skilled technologists, the tradesmen and women who must be educated in STEM curriculum as well.
    Marc Finer
    Littleton, Colorado

  3. pattmcn

    April 10, 2010 at 11:07 pm

    Love this idea . We do the gingerbread man every year and I know the children would love working on a project like this! Can’t wait to try it and see what solutions they come up with.

  4. pattmcn

    April 10, 2010 at 11:07 pm

    Love this idea . We do the gingerbread man every year and I know the children would love working on a project like this! Can’t wait to try it and see what solutions they come up with.

  5. patty o novak

    April 13, 2010 at 2:03 pm

    To pattmcn, glad you liked the article! I would love to hear about your experiences when you try it in your class!

  6. patty o novak

    April 13, 2010 at 2:03 pm

    To pattmcn, glad you liked the article! I would love to hear about your experiences when you try it in your class!

  7. patty o novak

    April 13, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    To Marc, Thank you for such a thoughtful response to my article! I appreciate the time you took to write your comment. Your point about technology, especially about how important it is that “we don’t just think of the T in STEM as computers.” I could not agree more! Thank you for showing me some examples of how my article could have incorporated technology with engineering – will keep it in mind for future articles!
    Patty

  8. patty o novak

    April 13, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    To Marc, Thank you for such a thoughtful response to my article! I appreciate the time you took to write your comment. Your point about technology, especially about how important it is that “we don’t just think of the T in STEM as computers.” I could not agree more! Thank you for showing me some examples of how my article could have incorporated technology with engineering – will keep it in mind for future articles!
    Patty