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A call for curricular support as Common Core standards take hold

Curriculum should not be ignored in education reform efforts, experts say

Many education experts are hoping for curriculum support as common standards take hold.

A diverse group of educators and stakeholders is calling for clear curricular guidance to complement the new Common Core State Standards that most states have adopted, including support for practical designs and examples of curriculum strategies that educators can use in their own classrooms.

The statement, released by the nonpartisan Albert Shanker Institute and signed by dozens of educators, advocates, policy makers, researchers, and scholars from across the educational and political spectrum, highlights the creation of voluntary model curricula that can be taught in the nation’s classrooms.

“It’s really a travesty … what many of our children are receiving in terms of instruction today,” said Susan B. Neuman, a professor in the University of Michigan’s School of Education and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Elementary and Secondary Education.

For more on the Common Core standards, see:

Common Core standards call for uncommon shifts in practices

Viewpoint: School leaders need more help, and not red tape, to transform education

States having problems with Common Core standards

“Standards are merely road maps—but they don’t tell us much about what kids really need. So many of our children are in test-driven situations … and are really not getting the depth of instruction that they so clearly need. This is a complement to the standards,” Neuman said.

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, urged broad support and dissemination for the statement, titled “A Call for Common Content.”

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Comments:

  1. smcdill

    March 8, 2011 at 1:17 pm

    All of this sounds well and good, but the bottom line is that until we get parents and discipline on board with the education system, we are going no-where! Many students are NOT interested in learning and don’t seem to see the correlation between school and preparation for a career. Parents don’t have control of their children at home and don’t want educators “making” their children do anything that they don’t want to do. Please forgive my complaints, when in fact a real solution is needed and soon!

  2. smcdill

    March 8, 2011 at 1:17 pm

    All of this sounds well and good, but the bottom line is that until we get parents and discipline on board with the education system, we are going no-where! Many students are NOT interested in learning and don’t seem to see the correlation between school and preparation for a career. Parents don’t have control of their children at home and don’t want educators “making” their children do anything that they don’t want to do. Please forgive my complaints, when in fact a real solution is needed and soon!

  3. hdickens

    March 8, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    commoncore.org A simple way to find were and what to teach through curriculum maps and tied to the common store standards!

  4. hdickens

    March 8, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    commoncore.org A simple way to find were and what to teach through curriculum maps and tied to the common store standards!

  5. rsimanga

    March 9, 2011 at 2:09 am

    yes to a common curricula. Namibia has one, but one wonders to what extent this has helped us to become a nation. there are numerous complaints voiced by some citizens – advocating for more district inputs as this will in a way respond to unique situations/contexts and local needs. the contents of a district curricula will address the needs of students, but this will not prepare students for global challenges as such. so there is a need to blend national/common curricula with local curricula. this in itself calls for curricula experts to provide appropriate directions – which way to go!

  6. rsimanga

    March 9, 2011 at 2:09 am

    yes to a common curricula. Namibia has one, but one wonders to what extent this has helped us to become a nation. there are numerous complaints voiced by some citizens – advocating for more district inputs as this will in a way respond to unique situations/contexts and local needs. the contents of a district curricula will address the needs of students, but this will not prepare students for global challenges as such. so there is a need to blend national/common curricula with local curricula. this in itself calls for curricula experts to provide appropriate directions – which way to go!

  7. acitzler

    March 9, 2011 at 11:20 am

    As an educator, I do appreciate clear guidelines on what I am expected to teach. However, I hesitate to endorse any set of lock-step, day by day scripted curriculum that does not allow me to adjust to my students’ needs or interests. I think that under the pressure to meet state and federal school ranking requirements, districts are pushing for a lock-step approach which they incorrectly justify as being supported by the movement for a common curriculum. We need to be careful that we do not undermine the expertise and training of excellent teachers by handing them a script and calling it a common curriculum.

  8. acitzler

    March 9, 2011 at 11:20 am

    As an educator, I do appreciate clear guidelines on what I am expected to teach. However, I hesitate to endorse any set of lock-step, day by day scripted curriculum that does not allow me to adjust to my students’ needs or interests. I think that under the pressure to meet state and federal school ranking requirements, districts are pushing for a lock-step approach which they incorrectly justify as being supported by the movement for a common curriculum. We need to be careful that we do not undermine the expertise and training of excellent teachers by handing them a script and calling it a common curriculum.

  9. brywick

    March 14, 2011 at 3:35 pm

    As an educator, acitzler displays the typical viewpoint of the entrenched, failed system. If the expertise and training of teachers were excellent and widespread, we wouldn’t have the the disaster that our education system is.

  10. brywick

    March 14, 2011 at 3:35 pm

    As an educator, acitzler displays the typical viewpoint of the entrenched, failed system. If the expertise and training of teachers were excellent and widespread, we wouldn’t have the the disaster that our education system is.