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Why is comedian Louis C.K. so angry with Common Core?

In a fit of rage, comedian Louis C.K. tweets to his 3.3 million followers why he is upset with Common Core State Standards

louis-common-core

Comedian Louis C.K. Credit: Wikipedia

Louis C.K., a successful comic with a hit show on FX called Louie, created a viral explosion after venting his frustration on Twitter with practices surrounding the Common Core–a set of academic standards in English and math that outline student learning goals.

In a series of rants, the comedian complained not so much that his third graders’ homework was difficult, but that it was very confusing.

Anna Merlan has more on this writing in the Village Voice.

Apparently, Louis is not alone. Other agitated parents published copies of their children’s homework online, denouncing Common Core assignments as incoherent.

eSchool News has more on the Common Core controversy here.

These words have been retweeted over 7,300 times since Monday: “My kids used to love math. Now it makes them cry. Thanks standardized testing and Common Core!”

Do you think these types of criticisms against Common Core standards are legitimate or is this issue being exploited and overblown? Share your thoughts in the comments section below and by following me on Twitter @Michael_eSM.

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Comments:

  1. bethgallo

    May 2, 2014 at 5:08 pm

    They are legitimate! They must have been written by people who haven’t taught in a k-12 classroom for a very long time!

  2. jagad5

    May 8, 2014 at 3:47 pm

    The examples used by critics seem to illustrate pathetic implementation (particularly at the classroom level) of Common Core standards. I also struggle to see how such examples are supposed to teach anyone anything defined by the standards documents I have read. The example included with this article is an obtuse way to teach something as concrete as subtraction. Teachers need to be able to explain the same concept a dozen ways, not try to force every student to learn it by the most convoluted route devised.