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Can eBooks help bridge achievement gaps?

Research confirms that reading matters, and having books at home is a leading indicator of a child’s level of educational attainment. Where do electronic books fit in?

Can eBooks help bridge achievement gaps?

 

Having books in the home pushes students an average of 2.4 years further in school.

 

A massive study published last spring confirmed what many educators already know: having books in the home is as significant as socioeconomic status or parents’ educational level in determining the level of education children ultimately will attain.

Now, as more traditional book content goes digital and smart phones act as electronic readers, educators are left wondering whether technology will make achievement gaps even wider—or whether electronic books might act as a bridge for students traditionally hamstrung by family circumstances and other issues neither they nor their teachers control.

Conducted by university researchers in Nevada, California, and Australia, the study—published in the journal Research in Social Stratification and Mobility—found that having a 500-book library at home has as great an effect as having university-educated parents. The 20-year study analyzed data from 27 different countries.

In the United States, having books in the home pushes students an average of 2.4 years further in school; worldwide, the average is 3.2 years.

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Having books in the home outweighed the education level of the parents, the father’s occupation, and the country’s GDP or political system. Children of parents with the least amount of education benefited the most.

Even having as few as 20 books in the home still had a significant impact, according the University of Nevada’s Mariah Evans, one of the study’s lead researchers. “You get a lot of ‘bang for your book,’” she said in a press release. “It’s quite a good return-on-investment in a time of scarce resources.”

For school officials, teachers, and community leaders struggling to bridge long-standing educational attainment and achievement gaps among different student groups, the implications are clear: We need to get more books in the home and into the hands of students.

Format might not matter. While many people still relish the smell of newly printed books or finding hidden treasures in library stacks, a small Massachusetts boarding school has shifted its media center to an all-digital format.

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Comments:

  1. eburton

    January 4, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    While having e-books are a great way to keep our country greener the smell and feel of a book is NOT always the same as reading on a digital device. Reading on a Kindle is often not comfortable when outside either as sunlight creates a glare.

    Additionally, small children from a young age will SEE books around their homes whereas digital devices present an object permeance effect of children not seeing and therefore not benefiting from what is available.

    Stepping Stones Together, http://www.steppingstonestogether.com combats this early reader problem with access to 90 e-books and/or printable easy and motivational readers your child will love for a very affordable $19.99.
    Erika Burton, Ph.D.
    Stepping Stones Together, Founder
    Empowering parental involvement in early literacy skills
    http://www.steppingstonestogether.com

  2. eburton

    January 4, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    While having e-books are a great way to keep our country greener the smell and feel of a book is NOT always the same as reading on a digital device. Reading on a Kindle is often not comfortable when outside either as sunlight creates a glare.

    Additionally, small children from a young age will SEE books around their homes whereas digital devices present an object permeance effect of children not seeing and therefore not benefiting from what is available.

    Stepping Stones Together, http://www.steppingstonestogether.com combats this early reader problem with access to 90 e-books and/or printable easy and motivational readers your child will love for a very affordable $19.99.
    Erika Burton, Ph.D.
    Stepping Stones Together, Founder
    Empowering parental involvement in early literacy skills
    http://www.steppingstonestogether.com

  3. LarrySanger

    January 4, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    There are some great ebooks out there on the iPad for little kids.

    But the Barnes and Noble ebook reader for children, released recently (today?), does not sell kids’ picture books more cheaply than paper books. As very much involved parents, we’ll stick with paper books instead of buying ebooks, if they’re going to cost the same, or even a little less. They have to be a LOT less in order for us to buy ebooks instead of paper copies.

    Larry Sanger
    http://www.larrysanger.org/

  4. LarrySanger

    January 4, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    There are some great ebooks out there on the iPad for little kids.

    But the Barnes and Noble ebook reader for children, released recently (today?), does not sell kids’ picture books more cheaply than paper books. As very much involved parents, we’ll stick with paper books instead of buying ebooks, if they’re going to cost the same, or even a little less. They have to be a LOT less in order for us to buy ebooks instead of paper copies.

    Larry Sanger
    http://www.larrysanger.org/

  5. kaidupe

    January 4, 2011 at 4:21 pm

    There is no doubt that reading is a huge part of achievement. Not only do I agree with the idea of using eReaders to foster an interest and desire to read, but even further I support looking into the possibility of using audiobooks as another way for students to consume knowledge.

    Kai Dupe
    http://www.whereareblacksintechnology.com

  6. kaidupe

    January 4, 2011 at 4:21 pm

    There is no doubt that reading is a huge part of achievement. Not only do I agree with the idea of using eReaders to foster an interest and desire to read, but even further I support looking into the possibility of using audiobooks as another way for students to consume knowledge.

    Kai Dupe
    http://www.whereareblacksintechnology.com