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Schools see rising scores with iPads

Educators say students who use the touch-screen devices for class appear to be more engaged in their studies.

Want to improve student academic performance? There’s an app for that.

Hundreds of middle school students in the central San Joaquin Valley, Calif., and across the state—each with a school-issued iPad—are using curriculum apps for their classwork and homework.

Educators say students who use the touch-screen devices for class appear to be more engaged in their studies. Students can view their school work anywhere and eMail their teachers anytime.

It seems to be making a difference: Test scores of iPad-using students are climbing.

In Fresno Unified School District, where 100 students at Kings Canyon and Sequoia middle schools are part of a four-district pilot program, the results are promising, spokeswoman Susan Bedi said.

More news about mobile learning:

‘Bring your own device’ catching on in schools

Experts give advice on mobile learning

Mobile learning: Not just laptops any more

Survey: Mobile learning at a tipping point

“The iPads have created excitement about learning algebra, which indicates that students are more engaged in the classroom,” she said, “and that will equate to higher achievement.”

School is cool

Teachers say students are more interested in learning because it’s happening where they want to be—on the cutting edge of technology.

This year, each sixth-grader at Corcoran Unified’s John Muir Middle School got an iPad from the district, one of the few in the nation to hand them out to an entire grade level.

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Comments:

  1. crschmiesing

    May 10, 2011 at 3:03 pm

    The iPads have been out for just over a year (1 year anniversary in April) and they are indeed ‘cool tools’, but is it the iPad that is making a difference? Or just the fact that they have access to this new technology?

    Did we hear the same type of reports, which encouraged providing laptops for every student?

    Also, how much of these thing actually reside on the device? In other words, if a student’s iPad is damaged, how will that impact their education? I am of the opinion that moving to a ‘cloud’ environment (where everything from textbooks to homework assignments to apps) is readily available from the ‘net on practically any device (Apple, Android, Windows, etc.) would be critical to long-term success. Yes, the content must be engaging, as does the technology, but it should not be platform-specific.

  2. crschmiesing

    May 10, 2011 at 3:03 pm

    The iPads have been out for just over a year (1 year anniversary in April) and they are indeed ‘cool tools’, but is it the iPad that is making a difference? Or just the fact that they have access to this new technology?

    Did we hear the same type of reports, which encouraged providing laptops for every student?

    Also, how much of these thing actually reside on the device? In other words, if a student’s iPad is damaged, how will that impact their education? I am of the opinion that moving to a ‘cloud’ environment (where everything from textbooks to homework assignments to apps) is readily available from the ‘net on practically any device (Apple, Android, Windows, etc.) would be critical to long-term success. Yes, the content must be engaging, as does the technology, but it should not be platform-specific.

  3. wallace

    May 11, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    I completely agree that technology helps in productivity. However, technology is just another means to get the information across to an audience. It is not the lesson. It is not a teacher who brings meaningful approaches to lessons being learned. The interaction is a necessity. Sure, questions can be emailed, but there will most probably be a lag time in response for any number of reasons. Education will always have to go through surges of reinvention. It goes along and parallels with the nature of learning.
    I think the biggest challenge with advancing technology is the lack of maturity and responsibility with the users. Money, of course, is an inherent factor. Until the young generation learns that technology is not the only answer, there is still a lot more learning that comes with the application. Is there an app for that?

  4. wallace

    May 11, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    I completely agree that technology helps in productivity. However, technology is just another means to get the information across to an audience. It is not the lesson. It is not a teacher who brings meaningful approaches to lessons being learned. The interaction is a necessity. Sure, questions can be emailed, but there will most probably be a lag time in response for any number of reasons. Education will always have to go through surges of reinvention. It goes along and parallels with the nature of learning.
    I think the biggest challenge with advancing technology is the lack of maturity and responsibility with the users. Money, of course, is an inherent factor. Until the young generation learns that technology is not the only answer, there is still a lot more learning that comes with the application. Is there an app for that?

  5. flanneryp

    May 16, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    Ever hear of the Hawthorne Effect?

  6. flanneryp

    May 16, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    Ever hear of the Hawthorne Effect?

  7. djoy1218

    May 16, 2011 at 3:16 pm

    I was wondering about where to get grants for the iPads. I heard about using iPads and iPods at a recent conference. They seem to really motivate and excite students about learning. Please write if you know of any grants of any other funding for this or other technology.

  8. djoy1218

    May 16, 2011 at 3:16 pm

    I was wondering about where to get grants for the iPads. I heard about using iPads and iPods at a recent conference. They seem to really motivate and excite students about learning. Please write if you know of any grants of any other funding for this or other technology.

  9. hvyhytr

    May 16, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    Wow, after just one year this cool device has convinced everyone to replace proof with mere anecdote. What a tool, hallucinations without chemicals. Wish we’d have had these things in the 60s.

  10. hvyhytr

    May 16, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    Wow, after just one year this cool device has convinced everyone to replace proof with mere anecdote. What a tool, hallucinations without chemicals. Wish we’d have had these things in the 60s.

  11. tpeitzman

    May 31, 2011 at 8:40 am

    The real key here is engagement. In the classroom, there are many ways to engage a learner. Great teachers do engage their students this using the strategies and the tools they have, whether that is using chalk, a laptop or an iPad. But not all students are created equal, and meeting the ever-changing individual needs of students is a challenge. Providing teachers and students with current tools that can engage learners in the classroom is a necessity.

  12. tpeitzman

    May 31, 2011 at 8:40 am

    The real key here is engagement. In the classroom, there are many ways to engage a learner. Great teachers do engage their students this using the strategies and the tools they have, whether that is using chalk, a laptop or an iPad. But not all students are created equal, and meeting the ever-changing individual needs of students is a challenge. Providing teachers and students with current tools that can engage learners in the classroom is a necessity.

  13. cindycoker

    June 1, 2011 at 3:03 pm

    From personal experience, I am a huge fan of I-pads, especially for young children learning basic literacy and mathematics concepts. My two daughters have simply replaced virtually all their time passively watching TV with the interactive books and apps. As a result, the three-year old knows all her letters, sounds, shapes, basic ABC patterns and numeracy skills that are typically taught in Kindergarten – and she is not yet in PreK. My four-year old is reading at the beginning of First grade level and adds and subtracts. I wish I could take the credit for their impressive level of knowledge, but I can’t – the IPad is the source. It provides good, appropriate content with immediate feedback and reinforcement.

  14. cindycoker

    June 1, 2011 at 3:03 pm

    From personal experience, I am a huge fan of I-pads, especially for young children learning basic literacy and mathematics concepts. My two daughters have simply replaced virtually all their time passively watching TV with the interactive books and apps. As a result, the three-year old knows all her letters, sounds, shapes, basic ABC patterns and numeracy skills that are typically taught in Kindergarten – and she is not yet in PreK. My four-year old is reading at the beginning of First grade level and adds and subtracts. I wish I could take the credit for their impressive level of knowledge, but I can’t – the IPad is the source. It provides good, appropriate content with immediate feedback and reinforcement.


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