According to curriculum therapists, multi-disciplinary sessions appeal to students’ creativity, are relevant to their everyday lives, and help them acquire important skills—especially students with autism.

In a recent webinar, “Art, Music & Recreational Therapy: Incorporating Creative Approaches for Students with Autism,” Courtney Carnes, MS, ATR-BC, art therapist; Julie Hopkins, MT-BC, music therapist; and Erin Witschey, CTRS, recreational therapist, discussed how these types of therapies are used to support individuals with autism by focusing on specific needs of younger and older students and targeting a variety of goals.

Art for Students with Autism


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About the Author:

Meris Stansbury

Meris Stansbury is the Editorial Director for both eSchool News and eCampus News, and was formerly the Managing Editor of eCampus News. Before working at eSchool Media, Meris worked as an assistant editor for The World and I, an online curriculum publication. She graduated from Kenyon College in 2006 with a BA in English, and enjoys spending way too much time either reading or cooking.