Is it time to redefine “gifted and talented”?

Manhattan mom Heather McFadden is grateful that entrance into the prized New York City Gifted and Talented program has worked out for her two kids, Mind/Shift reports. Her daughter cleared both hurdles – she scored in the 99th percentile on the test, and then was lucky enough to get chosen for the lottery. Her son tested in as well. “I am thankful they [gifted programs] exist. There simply wasn’t a school in our district we would send our kids to because of their ratings,” McFadden said. “G and T [Gifted and Talented] was our only chance besides moving.” She had also heard from teachers that kids who are more advanced would not be challenged in a standard setting…

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Opinion: Why gifted students can be so challenging

What do Woody Allen and Steve Jobs have in common? Among other things (including brilliant, creative minds), they both hated school and were discipline problems, says Mark Phillips, professor emeritus of secondary education at San Francisco State University and author of a monthly column on education for the Marin Independent Journal, for the Washington Post. Allen once said, “I loathed every day and regret every moment I spent in school.” Jobs noted, “I was pretty bored at school and turned into a little tyrant.”  Who are their counterparts today? How are schools dealing today with bright, creative students who are bored out of their minds in class?

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Five myths about ‘gifted and talented’ students

My colleague Kevin Sieff wrote about gifted and talented programs in this Washington Post story, which focuses on the racial enrollment gap, says Valerie Strauss, Washington Post columnist. Even in school systems with a majority of African-American and Hispanic students, white and Asian students tend to dominate in G&T programs. The story raises a number of questions, including how students are chosen for these programs, and, ultimately, what gifted and talented means, and how to tell if a child really deserves the designation. There is a definition of “gifted students” that was developed in the 1972 Maryland Report to Congress, which was the first national report on gifted education. It remains the current federal definition, though states and districts are not required to use it…

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