The unbeaten path to hybrid learning

Virtual learning, and the forms in which virtual and in-person education meet, have sparked controversy in the educational community. 

Often we debate what consequences this type of education has. We wonder whether traditional learning methodologies–with their big appetite for control and constant evaluation–are even achievable when classes are hybrid. But by focusing on impacts only, we overlook the essential issue: What’s the real purpose of education?

We should be primarily concerned with how education helps students achieve their personal and professional goals, whether virtual, in-person, or hybrid–a methodology targeting students’ development will help teachers capitalize on every lesson triumphantly.…Read More

Why AI is the future of Socratic learning methods

Every student and teacher across the globe experienced the massive challenges that evolved so ubiquitously as COVID-19 led to the shutdown of schools and a complete transformation of daily routines.

Educators had to swiftly adjust to online learning, adapting classroom techniques to their new digital settings. A multitude of training sessions and workshops were held by individuals and institutions as teachers desperately attempted to get on board with the new normal.

Keeping students engaged in online learning, whether synchronous or asynchronous, has been one of the greatest struggles educators have had to face. Ensuring that each learner is accommodated, supported, and engaged on a platform that is no longer a classroom with walls, or borders, or exclusivity, is the conundrum teachers are facing at this very moment.…Read More

Does research support flipped learning?

Though quantitative and rigorous qualitative data on flipped learning is limited, a recent literature review based on teacher reports, course completion rates, and supported methodology research indicates that flipped learning is more than just a fad for bored teachers and students—it’s improving student achievement in classrooms across the country.

With interest continuing to grow around flipped learning (for example, in January 2012, about 2,500 educators were members of the Flipped Learning Network [FLN] Ning; by March 2013, more than 12,000 educators were participants), researchers at George Mason University with the support of Pearson undertook a review of research relevant to what’s quickly becoming the trendiest model of learning.

(Next page: Learning methods behind Flipped Learning)…Read More