Teachers say social media—including the popular site Facebook—can be a vital educational resource if used appropriately.

Should students and teachers ever be friends on Facebook? School districts across the country, including the nation’s largest, are weighing that question as they seek to balance the risks of inappropriate contact with the academic benefits of social networking.

Dozens of school districts nationwide have approved social media policies. Schools in New York City and elsewhere have disciplined teachers for Facebook activity, and Missouri legislators recently acquiesced to teachers’ objections to a strict statewide policy.

In the New York cases, one teacher friended several female students and wrote comments including “this is sexy” under their photos, investigators said. A substitute teacher sent a message to a student saying that her boyfriend did not “deserve a beautiful girl like you.”

Such behavior clearly oversteps boundaries, but some teachers say social media—including the popular site Facebook—can be a vital educational resource if used appropriately, especially because it’s a primary means of communication for today’s youngsters.

“eMail is becoming a dinosaur,” said David Roush, who teaches media communications and television production at a Bronx high school. “Letters home are becoming a dinosaur. The old methods of engaging our students and our parents are starting to die.”

New York City Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott plans to release social media guidelines this month, saying recently that teachers “don’t want to be put in a situation that could either compromise them or be misinterpreted.”

See also:

Education groups weigh in on digital media use policies

Developing sound social media policies for schools

Fake Facebook identities are a real problem for schools

Roush does not accept students as friends on his personal Facebook page but has created a separate profile to communicate with them—something that runs afoul of Facebook rules restricting users to a single profile. He used the page to get the word out quickly about a summer internship on a cable-access show, and a student who learned about it from the Facebook post won it.

“If I would have eMailed him, if I had tried calling him, he never would have got it,” Roush said.

Nkomo Morris, who teaches English and journalism at a high school in Brooklyn, said she has about 50 current and former students as Facebook friends. That could be a problem if the new rules instruct teachers not to friend students.

In that event, “I’d send out a massive message, and I would unfriend them,” Morris said.

In the meantime, Morris manages her privacy settings so neither current nor former students see her personal information but do see posts about current events. She also lets students know whether something on their Facebook pages raises a red flag, such as sexual content.