Writing is used to assess student learning more often than it is used to facilitate learning. We talk about writing as a product for assessment, a subject where paragraphs and commas are taught, or a skill that one either has developed or lacks. Rarely do we hear people, even teachers, discuss writing as a process for learning.

Imagine if a teacher said, “Go write on it and see what you come up with,” after a student asked a question. “Writing organizes and clarifies our thoughts,” writes William Zinsser in Writing to Learn: How to Write--And Think--Clearly about Any Subject...

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About the Author:

Eileen Murphy Buckley is the founder and CEO of ThinkCERCA, a web-based literacy platform that helps educators teach critical thinking through argumentative writing. She taught English for 15 years and was the founding English Department Chair at Walter Payton College Prep. She is the author of 360 Degrees of Text (NCTE, 2011). As the Director of Curriculum and Instruction for over 100 of Chicago’s highest performing schools, she became passionate about the role technology could play in education in the 21st century and left CPS in 2012 to develop ThinkCERCA to help all students achieve career and college readiness. ThinkCERCA is one of the Gates Foundation’s top Literacy Courseware Challenge winners.