What is flipped learning? You might wonder why we’re asking, because the phrase is pretty universally known. But while the term is recognizable, definitions vary–and the wrong idea about flipped learning could be detrimental to schools.

At ISTE 2017, flipped learning pioneer Jon Bergmann introduced session attendees to Flipped Learning 3.0, and described the 8 principles that are crucial to any school’s flipped learning journey.

If you don’t know what flipped learning is, or if you want to get a solid grip on the concept before you present it to your teachers, here’s a primer.

In traditional classrooms, the teacher uses group space and time to instruct, and students use individual space at home to complete homework and other assigned activities. In flipped environments, students use their individual/at-home time to access learning and instructional material with a device. In the group space during class time, students are actively engaged in learning activities, though not always with a device.

Bergmann referenced the Flipped Learning Network’s definition as a pretty solid explanation for educators who are unsure: “Flipped learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.”

(Next page: The 8 guiding principles for effective flipped environments)


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