Who hasn’t sent a text or email to the wrong person? Who hasn’t posted something online they later regretted or seen something in their feed that made them uncomfortable? These are difficult moments for people, no matter their age, and it’s natural to be unsure what to do. But the most common advice young people get about social media is usually limited to “Think before you send” and “Once you post something, it’s always there.” These clichés may be true, but they don’t help young people address the situation they’re in.

If you work with young people in any capacity, you are also teaching social media norms and expectations. But what do norms mean in the context of social media? Norms are a standard or pattern of social behavior that is typical or expected of a group. Our social media use is still so new that we are all trying to figure out what our social media norms are and should be. From when we use it to how and where, we are all trying to figure it out as we go.

How to talk with your students about social media

When it comes to issues that impact their lives, young people are equal to us in subject-matter expertise, if not more so. But this is easy to forget. When we do, we miss the larger context and therefore the opportunity to actually accomplish our goals: teaching them how to apply critical thinking to the information they receive, recognizing when it is being used to manipulate their opinions and perceptions, defining what responsible social interactions online look like, and developing awareness about how its use can impact their sense of self and understanding of the world.

(Next page: Practical advice for talking to your students)

About the Author:

Rosalind Wiseman is the founder of Cultures of Dignity. All of her work is based on the belief that young people’s experiences are important but often discounted and that adults often give young people advice without listening to them first. She is the author of the New York Times’ bestsellers, Queen Bees & Wannabeswhich was turned into the movie Mean Girls, and Masterminds & WingmenShe is also the author of The Guide (which is being developed into a movie with the help of a teen advisory board)and the young adult novel, Boys, Girls and Other Hazardous Materials. In the fall of 2016, she published the Owning Up Curriculuma social emotional learning curriculum that she wrote in collaboration with middle and high school students.


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