Using video instruction to teach doesn't have to be intimidating--with a few creative strategies, you can create engaging lessons for all students

Institutionalizing equity through video instruction


Using video to teach doesn't have to be intimidating--with a few creative strategies, you can create engaging lessons for all students

While families have had to wait out a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic, I could not help but think about our most at-risk students–those with the least resources, the biggest gaps, and the largest hurdles.

Unfortunately, many of these children are already at a significant disadvantage. They are disadvantaged children without the same resources as other children. Therefore, it is not only important to help them; it is our responsibility as educators to do something about this gap.

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In quarantine, the gap widens. My greatest fear: these children need the most support, yet are farthest from our reach. How could we possibly find alternatives to help them and in so doing, close the gap? I discovered one. Teach kids on TV-PBS–through New Jersey’s incredible innovation, we brought instruction to 100,000 of our most needy children.

I submitted a proposal to present to middle school students from across the state of New Jersey, and discovered that my lesson submission had been accepted to be produced! Thinking about those children, trapped in their homes with little exposure to outside learning experiences, I eagerly planned my lesson, which aired on PBS.

Want to share a great resource? Let us know at submissions@eschoolmedia.com.