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Some teens start college work early via dual enrollment


Senioritis is said to sap the energy, dull the mind, and waste the time of high school students. But some teens have found a cure for the blahs: “Dual” or “concurrent” college classes let them earn high school and college credits for the same course, U.S. News reports. Some students go to a college campus, usually a local community college, while others study at their own high schools. Nationwide, more than a million high school students are taking at least one college class, it’s believed. Unlike Advanced Placement courses, which are geared to high achievers, dual enrollment is usually open to a wide range of students. Some programs target students at risk of dropping out. High achievers are going to college in any case, says Katherine Hughes of the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dual enrollment can motivate students who aren’t on the college track, she says. Even those who’ve struggled in high-school classes can rise to the challenge, motivated by the chance to “try on the role of a college student.”

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