Mississippi’s Vicksburg Warren School District and Discovery Education Launch New Partnership

SILVER SPRING, MD (Thursday, May 20, 2021)—Mississippi’s Vicksburg Warren School District (VWSD) today launched a new multiyear partnership with Discovery Education that helps educators connect current classroom instruction to students’ possible future career paths. Supported by the CVS Health Foundation and the CATCH Global Foundation, this new collaboration empowers district educators in grades K-6 with the dynamic digital resources and professional learning they need to equip every student to succeed in challenging courses, meet academic standards, and graduate from school prepared for college and career ready. Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-aligned digital curriculum resources, engaging content, and professional learning for K-12 classrooms. 

The Vicksburg Warren School District (VWSD) serves all of Warren County, Mississippi, and has an enrollment of approximately 7,200 students in grades Pre-K through 12. VWSD consists of three high schools (grades 9 – 12), three middle schools (grades 7-8), ten elementary schools, and an alternative program. As VWSD’s 2019-2024 Strategic Plan calls for increased opportunities to build student’s college and career readiness, the district sought a flexible digital resource that could provide relevant, real-world learning experiences, expand digital learning in all disciplines and grades, and support instruction either in the classroom or remote environment. 

Following a careful review of available options, VWSD selected Discovery Education’s flexible K-12 learning platform for classroom use. Discovery Education’s platform connects educators to a vast collection of compelling high-quality, standards-aligned content, ready-to-use digital lessons, and professional learning resources. Together, these resources give educators everything they need to facilitate instruction in any learning environment and create lasting educational impact.…Read More

Here’s how teachers think SEL can truly help students

A resounding majority of administrators, teachers, and parents say they believe social and emotional learning (SEL) is just as important as academic learning.

SEL is the process that helps students understand and regulate their emotions, understand different points of view and show empathy toward others, and develop intrapersonal and interpersonal competencies. Many believe these skills contribute to safer and more positive schools and communities.

Of the more than 1,000 people surveyed in McGraw-Hill Education’s 2018 Social and Emotional Learning Report, 96 percent of administrators, 93 percent of teachers, and 81 percent of parents overwhelmingly say SEL is as necessary as core academic subjects.…Read More

Obama urges states to raise academic standards

In order for U.S. to be first in world education, states need to raise their academic standards.
For the U.S. to lead the world in education, states need to raise their academic standards, Obama says.

Saying America’s “primacy in the world” is at stake, President Barack Obama on Feb. 22 prodded states to raise their academic standards by using the best leverage he has: money.

Speaking to governors gathered at the White House, Obama said he won’t “accept second place for the United States of America.” He noted that it continues to lag behind other nations in critical areas, including high school math and science skills.…Read More

Obama to propose new rules for reading and math standards

In a proposed change to the No Child Left Behind law, the Obama administration would require states to adopt new academic standards to qualify for federal money from a $14 billion program that concentrates on impoverished students, reports the New York Times. The proposal, part of the administration’s recommendations for a Congressional overhaul of the law, would require states to adopt “college- and career-ready standards” in reading and math. The current law, signed by President George W. Bush in 2002, requires states to adopt “challenging academic standards” in reading and math to receive federal money for poor students under the program known as Title I, but leaves it up to states to decide what qualifies as “challenging.” The result was that states set their standards at widely varied levels, some as rigorous as those used in high-performing countries like Japan, but others at far lower levels that lay out mediocre expectations for their students at best…

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