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Teaching in the world’s most isolated classroom


Last summer, I spent a month teaching academic English skills to North Korean university students at the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology, the country’s first privately funded university, says Karen Best, an English as a second language instructor at the University of Wisconsin, for the Washington Post. My main reason for going was to learn as much as possible. Of course, I wanted to teach well, and I felt confident I could do that. But I had no idea what I would learn and how this experience would affect me. The conversations and interactions that occurred in the classroom, during meals, and while playing and observing sports games, influenced not only my understanding of North Korea but also about the art of teaching. I’ll start first with what I learned about the students and their understanding of the world…

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