FETC 2009: School & Network Administration

Follett Software Co. said its Destiny Textbook Manager software was able to save Florida’s Escambia County School District $100,000 that would have been spent to purchase replacement textbooks. The Destiny Textbook Manager installs on district servers and can be accessed from any networked computer, allowing district officials to get a direct look at school textbook inventories.

GlobalScholar said it has acquired Colorado-based ExLogica Inc., developer of the Silk Student Information System and Silk Schedule. Through this collaboration, the ExLogica SIS and schedule will become part of the Pinnacle Suite, a set of online tools from GlobalScholar subsidiary Excelsior Software that manage and align curriculum, assessments, and more.

Lightspeed Systems unveiled automated energy conservation software that enables school and district IT staff to easily manage, reduce, and report energy use and costs for all the computers on their networks, the company said.

Psychological Software Solutions, which produces behavioral improvement solutions for schools, announced the results from several implementations reportedly demonstrating that use of its Five Steps to Improving Student Behavior and Review360 leads to noteworthy reductions in disruptive behavior, increased rates of inclusion for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, dramatic reduction in school district expenditures on behavioral services, and–ultimately–significant gains in academic achievement.

PublicSchoolWORKS released two new reporting tools in its Student Behavior Management System, an online system that tracks and documents behavior investigations, interventions, detentions, suspensions, out-of-class time, and remedial actions in an effort to improve staff, student, and parent communications. The new reporting additions, Positive Behavior Reports and Documentation Reports, allow school staff to easily reinforce, report, and communicate positive student behaviors and record non-referral behaviors that typically appear in teacher notebooks and are not available to building-level administrators, the company said.

PublicSchoolWORKS also announced a web-based, automated crisis management training program through its EmployeeSafe Suite. The Custom Crisis Management Training Module allows districts to create district- and school-specific courses that tie directly to their crisis management plan and reinforce required periodic drills.

Skyward demonstrated its School Management System, a complete software solution for all school administrative needs. The system encompasses student, finance, and human-resources information, enabling districts to better manage student progress, annual budgets, employee pay, and food service from a single, centralized database, Skyward said. Designed specifically for the needs of K-12 schools, the system also includes state reporting functionality.

TeleParent is a parental engagement tool designed to eliminate all barriers to effective communication, delivering vital information to all parents automatically in more than 20 languages, the company said. Users can choose from more than 700 preset messages to let parents know how their child is doing in class, if their child has missed school, or if there is some type of school emergency, among other things.

tags

FETC 2009: Safety & Security

Marshal8e6 demonstrated its internet and eMail security software for the K-12 market. The products are capable of securing all forms of internet-based communication streams, including eMail, web, instant messaging, and peer-to-peer applications, and they work across multiple operating systems and delivery platforms, the company said.

NetSupport announced the release of NetSupport Notify 2, the second generation of its desktop alerting and notification solution. A companion program to NetSupport’s desktop and classroom management solutions, NetSupport Manager and NetSupport School, NetSupport Notify 2 delivers a cost-effective, secure, and powerful desktop notification solution for both education and corporate networks, the company said. New features include operator sign-in for added security, more severity levels and timed options, centralized reporting and history, and the ability to customize alerts and apply multiple licenses to a single notification gateway.

Jeff Floreno, director of security operations and security for Wren Solutions, a provider of enterprise-class video surveillance solutions, presented a talk on "Security Assessment Methodology: New Techniques for Ensuring a Safe School Environment." The discussion covered new techniques for assessing a school’s safety and security profile, how different school zones present different sets of risks, ways to identify external safety and security risks, steps for implementing a continuous safety improvement process, and simple strategies for maintaining the visibility of safety and security compliance requirements.

 

tags

FETC 2009: Printing & Imaging

Konica Minolta unveiled the magicolor 7450 II grafx color laser printer, which offers the flexibility to express creative layouts, the company said–supporting page sizes up to 12.25 inches by 18 inches for full-bleed designs, and 12.25 inches by 47.24 inches for banner-size creations.

Lexmark promoted its "green" printing and document-management solutions for education. Eco-Copy allows for two-sided copies with the touch of a button. Print Release allows users to send a print job from their workstation or mobile device to be stored and printed later; jobs that have not been printed within a certain amount of time are deleted, eliminating unnecessary printing of forgotten or obsolete jobs. Distributed Capture converts paper documents into digital format so they can be electronically archived, retrieved, and distributed on demand. Automated Supplies Ordering ensures a school will not run out of toner or other print consumables by monitoring its devices and reordering when supplies are low, the company said.

Perceptive Software provides enterprise document management, imaging, and workflow solutions that seamlessly integrate with student information, administration, human resources, and other business systems, the company said. Perceptive’s ImageNow reportedly delivers the supporting documents a school district needs to effectively recruit and manage teachers; provide timely service to students, parents, and employees; and quickly complete daily tasks.

tags

Computer game takes aim at cyber bullying

Schools in Massachusetts’ Bristol and Plymouth counties will be the first in the nation to use a new computer game to educate children about bullying over cell phones and the internet, reports the Taunton Daily Gazette. Canadian software company LiveWires, through a partnership with the two counties’ district attorneys, is providing the schools with its computer game "Braincells," which was designed to educate children about cyber bullying and cell-phone hackers.?"I believe this program will be a very inexpensive and effective way to educate children about bullying over the internet and cell phones," Bristol County District Attorney Sam Sutter said during a Jan. 29 press conference at Bridgewater-Raynham Regional High School. "Our first responsibility as DAs is the prosecution of crimes. [But] in my opinion, an increasingly important aspect of the DA’s work is crime prevention." Bridgewater-Raynham has piloted other internet safety programs created by LiveWires, including "Missing," an educational game that teaches children about avoiding sexual predators online. Since the district first used the game, 15 million other students across the country have followed suit…

Click here for the full story

tags

Experts: ‘Obama worm’ probably a student prank

A new internet worm, discovered at an Illinois grade school, that displays an image of President Obama is likely a prank by a student, CNET reports. Walling Data, a distributor of AVG security software, said the worm it discovered on computers at an Illinois grade school spreads via external devices like USB drives and network shares. Once a week, on Mondays, it displays a photo of President Obama’s face in the lower right corner of screens on infected computers, but otherwise it appears to be more of a nuisance than a threat. The worm looks like a variant of MAL_OTORUN code that spreads using thumb drives and network shares, said Jamz Yaneza, a senior threat analyst and researcher at Trend Micro. "Someone played around with one of the many number of DIY malware kits and just added this small social engineering bait of Obama’s picture," he wrote in an eMail. Given that it lacks a malicious payload, "it is probably some prank by a student, since today’s ‘serious’ malware, as you may have noticed, would have at least installed a keylogger to steal some information," Yaneza wrote…

Click here for the full story

tags

FETC 2009: Purchasing, Professional Development, Consulting

Funds For Learning said it helped Oklahoma’s Okaloosa County School District secure more than $500,000 in funding for telecommunications services through the federal e-Rate program. The district received this funding with the help of the company’s e-Rate Manager for Applicants, an online suite of tools that simplifies the complex e-Rate application process, Funds For Learning said.

PBS TeacherLine has partnered with the School Improvement Network to incorporate new content into its Peer Connection product to help teachers turn research theory into classroom practice. PBS TeacherLine Peer Connection is an online suite of multimedia resources, instructional strategies, and tools that support educators responsible for providing onsite, job-embedded professional development to their peers.

PEPPM is a technology bidding and purchasing program that does the legwork by soliciting bids on popular lines of computer equipment, peripherals, software, audio-visual equipment, and communication products.

STI recently began offering Extreme Intervention through its Achievement solution to help schools and districts with response-to-intervention programs. Extreme Intervention is a customized professional coaching service that helps schools develop and implement response-to-intervention programs successfully, STI said.

TCPN (The Cooperative Purchasing Network) is a national purchasing cooperative that competitively bids and awards contracts for commonly purchased products and services. TCPN is a governmental entity founded to help school districts operate more efficiently.

Teachscape demonstrated Classroom Walkthrough 3.0, the latest version of its research-based process that allows school administrators to quickly collect data about classroom practices and use this information to work with teachers to plan and implement improvement activities. Teachscape also said it has partnered with the National School Boards Association (NSBA) to provide discounted, three-semester-hour graduate courses to NSBA Technology Leadership Network (TLN) member districts. All courses offered through this arrangement will save TLN members $100 off the price of the course and materials, the company said.

Turning Technologies announced three new educational consulting programs at FETC. Turn Up Achievement is a comprehensive school improvement program designed to create measurable increases in student achievement. It’s grounded in the belief that strong leadership, consistent data collection and analysis, continuous and ongoing professional development, proven curriculum, and community support will result in maximizing a school’s potential. Turn Up Learning, which helps schools implement a Response to Intervention program, is a problem-solving model for schools to identify instructional needs and intervene with evidence-based practices. And Turn Up Engagement is a systemic approach to increasing student engagement through a multi-disciplined integration of educational gaming. The core components of the program include a game design curriculum for K-12 computer science instructors, specific educational games for accelerating learning in core subject areas, and a progress monitoring system to ensure student achievement, the company explained.

tags

FETC explores a sea change in education

At a conference where participants discussed the sea change occurring in today’s schools and explored ways of using technology to meet the needs of a new generation of learners, perhaps it was only fitting that the opening keynote speaker was Philippe Cousteau, grandson of the famed ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, who spoke of technology’s power to reach students worldwide.

Cousteau kicked off the 2009 Florida Education Technology Conference (FETC) last week in Orlando, which organizers said drew 7,000 educators and school technologists from 49 states and 17 countries.

Before he spoke, Ronald Blocker, superintendent of Florida’s Orange County Public Schools, alluded to the changing nature of education, noting that today’s students crave technology.

"They’ve grown up with it. High school seniors were born in 1991, the same year the World Wide Web launched," Blocker said. "As teachers, it is our duty to speak in a language that students understand."

Then Cousteau took the stage, explaining how education has gotten him to where he is today.

"For three generations, education has been the driving force behind the work of my family," said Cousteau, who is the chief ocean correspondent for the Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet. "I am a product of good teaching."

It was the spirit of conservation and care for the environment taught by his grandfather that inspired him to work toward raising people’s awareness of the need to restore and protect the world’s oceans.

"Oceans are critical to all life on this planet, and they are in peril," Cousteau said.

He said the lessons he was taught by his grandfather and others in his life led him to found EarthEcho International, a nonprofit environmental education and conservation organization, with his sister.

Over the past year, Cousteau filmed a series of seven one-hour installments of an ocean documentary program. While he enjoyed the exploration of different oceans around the world, he said he was most impressed by his ability to use technology to further his work–and to share it with students from around the world.

"I could take videos on my cell phone and upload them to [the internet]. Or I could respond to questions from students on my eMail, and they could get the answers right away," he said.

Cousteau said he is also exploring ways to use documentary filmmaking in classrooms. He produced, co-directed, and wrote a documentary on the Everglades in which five high school students were invited to help during their summer vacation. He said they all planned to finish high school, but none saw the point in going to college.

"When I saw them [later that fall at the documentary premiere], their lives were changed. I could see what the power of teaching could do," he said. "All five of them had decided to go on to university."

Gaming: The future of education?

Other conference speakers discussed how gaming and other forms of interactive media can help educators reach students who were raised in an all-digital culture.

Gaming is moving out of the entertainment realm and into other areas, said Jim Brazell, president of ventureRAMP.com.

"We now have serious games. There are applications of video games to domains other than entertainment," he said Jan. 23 at an "eye opening" keynote–so named for its start time 28 minutes after sunrise. "Video games do not belong pigeonholed in entertainment."

Interactive games and simulations have become commonplace in areas such as health care and military training and have given birth to new models of playing, learning, and socializing, he said.

"You can get more data in a video game than in any other educational area," Brazell said, adding that gaming allows for the convergence of physical, virtual, and imaginary realities.

Video games have been used for things as diverse as emergency-response training and language acquisition. The utility of gaming derives from the fact that mammals learn best through play, according to Brazell.

"[Students] don’t know that the learning is embedded. That’s the thing about play, the learning is embedded," he explained.

Of the more than 75 attendees in the keynote session, nearly all said they were interested in using gaming in the classroom. Brazell said educators should start by determining what it is they hope to convey.

"Never start with the idea that you’re going to use a [specific] video game [as a teaching tool]. Decide what you want to teach, and then find the right application," he recommended.

But Brazell stressed that games should not replace the classroom experience or classroom teachers.

"We’re talking about blended learning," he said.

Other uses of interactive media

Interactive media have changed the way students learn and will continue to change the way teachers teach, says Chris Dede, a professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education.

"Almost any piece of information can now be found online in less than a minute," he said during another morning keynote session on Jan. 24. "We, as educators, must decide what … knowledge every student should learn to prepare for 21st-century work and citizenship."

During his address, titled "Emerging Interactive Media: What to Use, When, and How," Dede listed several other types of interactive media and gave examples of how they could be used in the classroom.

For example, Dede said, online discussion forums allow for students and teachers to collaborate on different topics that often go beyond the curriculum. He noted that one issue or challenge with using online forums in instruction is that the teacher has to facilitate the conversation. It is also necessary for students to learn the proper "netiquette"–etiquette that governs communication online.

Dede also spoke of ways to use podcasting and vodcasting (video podcasting) in instruction.

One of the educators in the audience suggested that teachers could record their lessons and provide them as MP3 files to students who had iPods or other digital audio players. That way, students who missed the lesson would be able to hear it–or students who needed to hear a particular part of the lesson again would be able to listen to it until the concepts are mastered.

Other interactive media that Dede discussed included writers’ workshops and fan fiction, wikis, mashups, social networking sites, blogs, photo and video sharing, social bookmarking, and collaborative social change sites.

For educational uses of blogging, Dede said, teachers could set up free, private blogs for the class to publish responses to class assignments, conduct peer reviews, collaborate on group projects, and share links of interest to the community. He said the biggest advantage of blogs is that they give students the chance to see their work instantly made public with prompt feedback.

Wikis are easy ways to collaborate on file creation, Dede said.

"Wikis provide opportunities for students to interact and learn as a group," he noted. "They can help students lean how to peer edit and to give and receive constructive criticism on their creative work, all at their own pace."

Social bookmarking sites allow users to sort and organize bookmarks using keywords, or tags, and store them in an online account. The bookmarks are then publicly or privately shared within an online community.

Dede said much can be learned about a student by what he or she tags. Social bookmarking, he said, can add transparency to the process by which students are gathering and integrating information, allowing teachers to guide students in evaluating sources of information.

Photo and video sharing could be used to eliminate language barriers, he said. Writers’ workshops and fan fiction are primarily used by teenagers and professionals because they require a complex understanding of the functionalities of the web, Dede said, but the frameworks could be adapted to create special sites for younger children or seniors. Workshops give small groups of like-minded people a space to provide constructive criticism and feedback.

A mashup is a new web application made from combining two or more specific web functionalities, which is then used to create an original representation of data and media.

"These mashups can be used in informal or formal education settings for gathering information, performing research, analyzing data, thinking critically, problem solving, and simply enriching course materials and subjects for better learning," Dede said. "By creating and sharing their own mashups, students can design tools that will meet their individual needs while building and sharing living knowledge repositories that are flexible to change."

Dede said social networking sites can be used in classrooms to allow students to connect to and interact with their classmates, as well as other students studying similar topics around the globe.

Another medium that Dede said he’s found to be useful in his classes is collaborative social change sites, such as www.care2.com, DoSomething.org, and www.idealist.org.
 
"Harvard students want to use educational technology to empower people across the world who are not empowered," he said.

On these sites, students take part in collaborative learning, where they work toward a common purpose of gaining knowledge about a specific problem.

News from the exhibit hall

Some 500 ed-tech companies were on hand in the FETC exhibit hall, demonstrating their latest products and solutions. Here are some of the highlights.

Instructional Solutions

Computers, Furniture, Infrastructure

School & Network Administration

Safety & Security

Printing & Imaging

Purchasing, Professional Development, Consulting

(Editor’s note: For more coverage of this year’s FETC, check out our online FETC Conference Information Center page: http://www.eschoolnews.com/conference-info/fetc.)

tags

College web design courses fail with bosses

Web site development experts said in a recent survey that colleges and universities lag behind in using the latest in web design technology and ignore foundational lessons that would produce college graduates ready for the rapidly changing profession.

The survey, called "Teach the Web," was released Jan. 20 and includes opinion and advice from 32 web design professionals who are considered some of the most knowledgeable and respected in the world.

James Archer, an executive at Phoenix-based Forty Agency, a marketing company, said in the survey that campus bureaucracies move slowly when approving new curriculum, while the web design industry "moves fast enough that the curriculum is obsolete by the time they get around to committee approval."

Forty Agency does not hire graduates of university web development programs, Archer said.

"The culture of large educational institutions has, in my experience, consistently proven itself unable to cope with the demands of such a varied and fast-moving industry," Archer said. "I know many good people are trying, but I’ve yet to see anyone come out of a university program knowing what they’d need to know in order for us to hire them. Most of the time, they’ve been brought a long way down the wrong path."

Leslie Jensen-Inman, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where she teaches design, business, and technology, wrote the "Teach the Web" survey and said web design college instructors should embrace the business’s harsh realities.

"Let’s face it. Technology moves fast; academia doesn’t," Jensen-Inman, a member of the Web Standards Project Education Task Force, wrote in the survey’s introduction.

She said campus officials should build relationships with leaders in the web design industry and use their advice to shape faculty approaches and college courses.

"As the people who will hire our students, they should have input about what type of students we are producing," Jensen-Inman wrote.

Several experts said slow-moving changes in university curriculum result in students learning about program such as Photoshop that will be considered outdated by the time they graduate and apply for jobs.

Because web design firms see constant change and updates to technology, some experts said students should develop basic knowledge to attract employers.

Molly Holzschlag, an author and web standards advocate, said "general awareness of the web, social networking and culture, strong spoken and written language skills, [and] enthusiasm and commitment to life-long learning" would signal to employers that a recent college graduate is capable of keeping up with ever-changing technology.

"Everything else can be taught, and will be taught, over and over as time goes on," said Holzschlag, who has written more than 30 books on web design. "Therefore, it’s the broadly educated, open-minded, and self-motivated individuals who would get my attention."

Cindy Li, director of content for Scrapblog, a site that markets multimedia scrapbooks, said college web development classes should incorporate design techniques that will make the internet more accessible to people with disabilities. Li said her mother is legally blind, adding that she uses a magnifying computer tool to view web sites. She said students should learn how to build web-based platforms that would allow legally blind web users to see a site without the magnifying tool.

"I think, especially in the USA, we’re so focused on the perfect youth we forget about the people who have disabilities but still want to experience the web," Li said in the "Teach the Web" survey.

Colleges should consider assembling a committee of web design veterans who could act as "an advisory panel like they do for corporations," she said.

Links:

"Teach the Web" survey

Scrapblog

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

tags

How to use interactive media as teaching tools

FETC2009

Interactive media has changed the way students learn and will continue to change the way teachers teach, says Chris Dede, a professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education.

“Almost any piece of information can now be found online in less than a minute,” he said during a morning keynote session Jan. 24 at the Florida Educational Technology Conference in Orlando. “We, as educators, must decide what … knowledge every student should learn to prepare for 21st-century work and citizenship.”

During his keynote address, titled “Emerging Interactive Media: What to Use, When, and How,” Dede listed numerous types of interactive media and gave examples of how they could be used in the classroom.

For example, Dede said online discussion forums allow for students and teachers to collaborate on different topics that often go beyond what the curriculum. He noted that one issue or challenge with using online forums in instruction is that the teacher has to facilitate the conversation. It is also necessary for students to learn the proper “netiquette”–etiquette that governs communication on the internet.

Dede also spoke of ways to use podcasting and vodcasting (video podcasting) in instruction.

One of the educators in the audience suggested that teachers could record their lessons and provide them as MP3 files to students who had iPods or other digital audio players. That way, students who missed the lesson would be able to hear it–or students who needed to hear a particular part of the lesson again would be able to listen to it until the concepts are mastered.

Other interactive media that Dede discussed included writers’ workshops and fan fiction, wikis, mashups, social networking sites, blogs, photo and video sharing, social bookmarking, and collaborative social change sites.

For educational uses of blogging, Dede said teachers could set up free, private blogs for the class to publish responses to class assignments, conduct peer reviews, collaborate on group projects, and share links of interest to the community. He said the biggest advantage of blogs is that they give students the chance to see their work instantly made public with prompt feedback.

Wikis are easy ways to collaborate on file creation, Dede said.

“Wikis provide opportunities for students to interact and learn as a group,” he said during his presentation. “They can help students lean how to peer edit and to give and receive constructive criticism on their creative work, all at their own pace.”

Social bookmarking sties allow users to sort and organize bookmarks using keywords, or tags, and store them in an online account. The bookmarks are then publicly or privately shared within an online community.

Dede said much can be learned about a student by what he or she tags. Social bookmarking, he said, may add transparency to the process by which students are gathering and integrating information, allowing teachers to guide students in evaluating sources of information.

Photo and video sharing could be used to eliminate language barriers, he said. Writers’ workshops and fan fiction are primarily used by teenagers and professionals because they require a complex understanding of the functionalities of the web, Dede said, but the frameworks could be adapted to create special sites for younger children or seniors. Workshops give small groups of like-minded people a space to provide constructive criticism and feedback.

A mashup is a new web application made from combining two or more specific web functionalities, which is then used to create an original representation of data and media.

“These mashups can be used in informal or formal education settings for gathering information, performing research, analyzing data, thinking critically, problem solving, and simply enriching course materials and subjects for better learning,” Dede said. “By creating and sharing their own mashups, students can design tools that will meet their individual needs while building and sharing living knowledge repositories that are flexible to change.”

Dede said social networking sites can be used in classrooms to allow students to connect to and interact with their classmates, as well as other students studying similar topics around the globe.

Another medium that Dede said he’s found to be useful in his classes is collaborative social change sites, such as Care2.com, DoSomething.org, and Idealist.org.

“Harvard students want to use educational technology to empower people across the world who are not empowered,” he said.

On these sites, students take part in collaborative learning, where they work toward a common purpose of gaining knowledge about a specific problem.

tags

“Ed-Tech Best Practices Summit”

Don’t miss the Ed-Tech Best Practices Summit on the exhibit hall floor at TCEA.  These informative sessions will focus on Data Management, Video-On-Demand and Digital Media Management, Interactive Whiteboard Technologies, Safer, Greener Technologies, Best-in-class Instructional Solutions, Video Distribution Technology, Smart Textbook Management, Online Resources and more.  Look below for the latest schedule

Join us on the exhibit hall floor for the following informative sessions:

Schedule of Sessions:

Wed. Feb. 4, 2009

12:45pm – 1:00pm
eSchool News Welcome & Introduction

1:00pm – 1:30pm
Skyward: Data Management
Success that Accelerates Analysis

Quality analysis of student information is critical to your decisions.  Learn how Skyward accelerates your district’s ability to get answers to your questions quickly and easily.
Presenter: Raymond Ackerlund, Director of Marketing, Skyward.
Organization: Skyward

2:00pm – 2:30pm
SAFARI Montage: Video-On-Demand and Digital Media Management That Works
SAFARI Montage is the award-winning Video-On-Demand and Digital Media Management enterprise solution for school districts that enables elegant visual instruction in the classroom.
Presenter: Tim Beekman, President, SAFARI Montage
Organization: SAFARI Montage

3:00pm – 3:30pm
Using mimio Interactive Whiteboard Technologies to Enhance Instruction
 Learn how to engage students during instruction using mimio Interactive Classroom Products.  Enhance instruction and "make it interesting" for your students.
Presenter: mimio Master Trainer
Organization: mimio

4:00pm – 4:30pm
ELMO USA: Safer, Greener Technologies for Your Students
 ELMO USA’s strong commitment to a Green classroom experience includes only offering products that don’t have any potentially negative effects from dangerous chemicals (such as mercury and lead) used in the manufacturing process.
Presenter:  Howard J. Winch, Executive VP-Sales
Organization: ELMO USA

5:00pm – 5:30pm
Pearson Curriculum Digital
 Pearson Curriculum Digital is committed to providing best-in-class instructional solutions for pre-K-12 research-based digital learning solutions that elevate the art and science of teaching.
Presenter: TBA
Organization: Pearson Curriculum Digital

Thurs. Feb. 5, 2009
9:30 am – 10:00am
eSchool News & JDL Horizons: Video Distribution
 JDL Horizons provides educators with customized quality staff development, teaching materials and effectively priced and featured video distribution technology.  Our Executives bring a wealth of management talent and experience to its thought leadership effort.
Presenter: TBA
Organization: eSchool News & JDL Horizons

2:00pm – 2:30pm
Smart Textbook Management Makes Dollars and Sense
 Learn best practices for textbook management in a tough economy from market leader Follett Software and keep your district fiscally sound while meeting educational mandates.
Presenter: Sherri Daniels, Dr. Project Manager
Organization: Follett

2:45pm – 3:15pm
eSN Online: The educator’s Indispensable Resource
 Discover how educators benefit from the deep, rich resources of eSchool News Online.  It’s all FREE from the world’s No. 1 ed-tech publication web site.
Presenter: Nancy David, Online Director
Organization: eSchool News

tags