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Study: Childhood ADHD may lead to troubles later on


Nearly a third of people diagnosed as children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) still have the condition in adulthood, according to a large new study that also found they’re more likely to develop other mental disorders and to commit suicide, Reuters Health reports. U.S. researchers who published their findings in Pediatrics on Monday found that about 29 percent of participants in the study who were diagnosed with ADHD as children ended up carrying that diagnosis into their late twenties.

“They still clearly had symptoms that continued to be consistent with that diagnosis. But that in itself has been an area of difficulty and controversy,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. William Barbaresi, from Boston Children’s Hospital.

ADHD, which is the most common neuro-developmental condition, affects between 3 percent and 7 percent of American school children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It’s more common in boys than girls…

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