Report: Why it is hard to monitor bullying at schools

The Washington Post reports that a new report that reviewed years of research says that it is hard to accurately monitor levels of bullying in schools because there is still no consensus on exactly what it is and that educators and scholars “should not limit themselves to the traditional definition” as they seek ways to combat it. The report, called “Prevention of Bullying in Schools, Colleges and Universities” and just released by the American Educational Research Association at its 2013 meeting in San Francisco, is the work of a blue-ribbon task force that was charged with finding short- and long-term recommendations for institutions to address bullying of young people…

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‘Bully’ documentary gets its own documentary on ‘Anderson Cooper 360’

A bully’s worst fear is revenge, so it’s special when a victim of bullying can turn those slurs and taunts into nationwide popularity, the Huffington Post reports. Alex Libby was 12 years old when director Lee Hirsch included him in a documentary entitled “Bully.” The film, which was released in 2011 and acquired shortly thereafter by the Weinstein Company, gave the boy his chance to change things — for himself and others. Ever since, he’s lent his face, time and energy to a worldwide movement against bullying. CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” will feature Libby’s story Thursday night in a documentary, called “The Bully Effect,” about the children featured in “Bully.”

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Study: Young students hiding intelligence, talent to avoid bullying

More than 90 percent of British children have been bullied or have witnessed someone being bullied due to their intelligence or talent, a survey by the U.K.-based Anti-Bullying Alliance has found, the Huffington Post reports. The research indicates that more than a quarter of the 1,000 11-16 year-olds surveyed, or 27.3 percent, have quit an activity they enjoy for fear of being bullying. About half have downplayed a talent for the same reason — a number that rises to 53 percent among girls. When it comes to core academic subjects, one in 10 children say they have made an effort to hide their science ability, while nearly one in five girls and more than one in 10 boys deliberately underachieve in math to evade bullying…

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Why telling bullying victims to ‘just fight back’ doesn’t work

Fall is upon us, and that means the school year is in full swing. Along with the stress of homework assignments and extracurricular activities, unfortunately some students bear an additional burden – bullying, reports CNN. October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, pushing the issue to the forefront of the nation’s consciousness. Educators and legislators are under pressure to prevent bullying, and many schools are implementing programs such as A Classroom of Difference, Steps to Respect and Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports that teach empathy, interpersonal skills and respect for those who don’t fit into the mainstream. But not everyone agrees with this approach to managing bullying. There are vocal groups of naysayers who believe that focusing on social emotional skills training and urging students to be accepting of those who are different is leading to the weakening of America. They argue that bullying is really a form of socialization, asserting that kids who do not conform to society’s expectations are bringing on their own troubles…

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Watch: Town rallies around girl pranked for homecoming

A small town in Michigan is rallying behind a teenage girl who had thoughts of killing herself after students at her high school elected her to the homecoming court as a joke, the Lookout reports.

“I had actually thought about suicide,” Whitney Kropp, a 16-year-old at Ogemaw Heights High School in West Branch, Mich., told Detroit’s WXYZ-TV after she found out about the homecoming hoax. “I thought I wasn’t worthy.”

But residents of Kropp’s farming community quickly rallied around her. A Facebook page was launched to support the bullied teen, generating nearly 40,000 “likes.” And local businesses—including a hair salon and a dress shop—pledged to donate their services to help her get ready for the festivities that culminate with a school dance on Sept. 29……Read More

Bullying of teachers more damaging in online era

Bullying of teachers has become increasingly cruel and even dangerous as students get access to advanced technology at earlier ages.

The bullying that bus monitor Karen Klein endured on a ride home from an upstate New York school was painful and egregious, but also shows how student harassment of teachers and administrators has become more spiteful and damaging in the online era.

Much attention has been paid to students who bully other students in class, after school, and on the internet. Less has been given to equally disturbing behavior by students who harass instructors, principals, and other adults.

It’s something that’s long existed; think ganging up on the substitute teacher. But it has become increasingly cruel and even dangerous as students get access to advanced technology at earlier ages.…Read More

Obama, Cartoon Network target bullying in documentary

President Barack Obama appears in an upcoming Cartoon Network documentary aimed at encouraging bullied children and others to speak up, and says that as the father of two young girls he is deeply concerned about the issue, Reuters reports. In an introduction to the 30-minute film, the president appeals to students, parents and teachers to take a stand on bullying.

“It’s wrong, it’s disruptive and we can all prevent it,” said Obama, who hosted the first White House conference on bullying last year. He said that he was speaking not only as the president but as a father. “We’ve all got more work to do. Everyone has to take action against bullying.”

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Public school crime in the U.S. on the decline

Violent crime at the nation’s schools is declining, and students and schools are reporting less bullying and gang activity, the Associated Press reports. But new government data reports an increase in cyber bullying and youth suicides.
“Cyber bullying issue has really moved to center stage and that’s probably the next major challenge that school officials and others will have to address,” said Ron Stephens, executive director of the National School Safety Center, a nonprofit advocacy organization. He said the higher number of suicides wasn’t surprising.
“I think that’s a number we’ll see increasing based on what’s happening with all the cyber bullying,” Stephens said…

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