Transforming summer school with high-dosage tutoring

Summer school as we’ve traditionally known it hasn’t worked well for a long time, especially from an equity standpoint, but we all know that change tends to come slowly to educational institutions. I would submit that in 2022, after two years of extraordinary learning loss, a transformation shouldn’t wait any longer.

Today’s students have different summer learning needs, and we have better tools and methods to teach them. It’s time to start using them.

The old model of summer classes in school buildings every day from 9 a.m. to noon stopped being convenient decades ago, when stay-at-home parenting stopped being the norm. Even if families manage to find transportation for their kids to and from school at those hours, there remains the question of filling in the remaining hours with part-time child care — never a cost-effective option even when it is available.…Read More

4 steps to maximize summer learning

As we emerge from the darkness of closed school buildings, several studies have come out about the effect of the pandemic on student learning. “Learning loss” and “unfinished learning” are the main topics of conversation among educators, along with summer school programs and tutoring.

Research points toward the importance of maintaining on-grade-level instruction in the coming school year, as opposed to remediation. As such, providing access to on-grade material and instruction is paramount to helping students close gaps and move forward.

Areas of need…Read More

7 ways to support summer learning–right now

The summer slide doesn’t have to be an obstacle

summer-learningSchool’s out for summer! But learning doesn’t have to stop. By now, you’re probably familiar with the term “summer slide,” and with efforts to keep students engaged in learning experiences throughout the summer break.

Seventy-six percent of teachers have said it is “extremely important” to practice skills and keep learning over the summer, and 84 percent of teachers said that students forget or “lose” grade-level equivalency, skills, and knowledge over the summer.

But 90 percent of teachers note that if kids remain involved in learning during the summer months, they’ll see more academic success.…Read More