“It Isn’t Enough to Not Be Racist.” ULC and Gale Call on Library Executives to Actively Embrace Anti-Racism’s Leadership Imperative

A New Urban Libraries Council Leadership Brief Highlights Action Strategies for Library Executives to Lead the Charge for Anti-Racism, Starting by Looking Inward

WASHINGTON & FARMINGTON HILLS, Mich. – The Urban Libraries Council (ULC) has published a new Leadership Brief on Anti-Racist Executive Leadership for Public Libraries, sponsored by Gale, a Cengage company. This resource examines the deep roots and enduring harm of structural racism in public libraries and challenges library executives to take on a more active, intentional and accountable role in strengthening their libraries as anti-racist institutions.

Introducing the Leadership Brief is the following quote from Baltimore County Public Library Director, Sonia Alcántara-Antoine, “In order to make any progress as library leaders, we need to look at our own history with humility and have the courage to recognize that we can be part of the solution.” Alcántara-Antoine is a member of ULC’s Anti-Racism action team, which informed the development of the Leadership Brief.…Read More

Curriculum Associates Sponsors the Council of the Great City Schools’ Inaugural Dr. Michael Casserly Legacy Award for Educational Courage and Justice

Casserly, Executive Director of the Council, to select an educator pursuing a graduate-level education degree to receive a $10,000 scholarship

Curriculum Associates partnered with the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS) to sponsor the first-ever Dr. Michael Casserly Legacy Award for Educational Courage and Justice. As part of the award, CGCS Executive Director Casserly will select an educator from one of the CGCS’s 77-member school districts who is pursuing a graduate-level degree in education to receive a $10,000 scholarship.

“The leading voice nationally in urban education, built over his 44 years of service to the Council of the Great City Schools, Dr. Casserly has made such a positive impact on students and educators,” said Woody Paik, executive vice president of Curriculum Associates. “In partnership with the CGCS, we are proud to help recognize the remarkable accomplishments of Dr. Casserly, as well as support a rising standout educator who—like Dr. Casserly—is passionate about urban education and is looking to take the next step in his or her career.”…Read More

2020 Green-Garner Award Recognizing Outstanding Leadership

As part of its support of urban education, Curriculum Associates has partnered with the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS) as a sponsor of the 31st annual Green-Garner Award. This year’s award recipient, Superintendent Michael Hinojosa of Dallas Independent School District in Dallas, Texas, was selected for this esteemed honor for his strong dedication to the needs of students, profound commitment to improvement, and significant community involvement and leadership.

“We are proud to partner with the CGCS as they recognize exemplary leadership in urban education through this coveted and long-standing award,” said Woody Paik, executive vice president of Curriculum Associates. “Superintendent Hinojosa is an exceptional district leader who is so well-deserving of this recognition. His ongoing work, as well as his commitment to urban education as a whole, has positively impacted students and educators across the district.”

The Green-Garner Award, which is presented each year at the CGCS’s Fall Conference, recognizes a board member or superintendent for their outstanding contributions in urban education. As the nation’s highest urban-education honor, the award is named in memory of urban school leaders Richard R. Green, the first African-American chancellor of the New York City school system, and Edward Garner, a businessman and former school board president of the Denver Public Schools. Superintendent Hinojosa was chosen for this recognition among 20 superintendent nominees from districts across the nation.…Read More

CAE Announces Stacey Sparks as Senior Director of Content Design and Development

Council for Aid to Education, Inc. (CAE), a leading provider of performance-based educational assessments measuring 21st century skills, as well as custom assessments, today announced the appointment of Stacey Sparks to senior director of content design and development. In this role, Sparks will lead content development for the services division and manage content experts and CAE’s production team.

“We are thrilled about Stacey guiding the design and development of performance-based assessments and custom solutions for our clients,” said Bob Yayac, president and CEO of CAE. “Great content is critical to effective assessments and her in-depth knowledge and experience in assessment, coupled with her outstanding writing and editing skills, strengthen our mission.”

Sparks has worked closely with clients including state departments of education, large urban school districts, multi-state consortia, and educational publishers to design and develop K-12 assessments, both formative and summative; digital and print curriculum materials; and professional development tools. She has extensive knowledge of educational frameworks and standards and is deeply committed to developing rigorous, engaging, accessible materials that promote equity and diversity. A seasoned writer and editor in English Language Arts and the humanities, Sparks previously served as a Senior Research Analyst at the American Institutes for Research and a Curriculum Writer for Public Consulting Group.…Read More

3 keys to student success with early college programs

Like a growing number of school districts, North Carolina’s Guilford County Schools (GCS) has early college programs that allow students to earn college credit while they’re still in high school. But what’s unique about GCS is the number of choices the district offers: 14 altogether, including nine high schools that operate on college campuses.

GCS has offered early college options since 2001 and has seen remarkable success, despite serving a largely urban and low-income population. All but two of its early college high schools have a 100-percent graduation rate—and the lowest rate among the other two is 97 percent.

What’s more, these programs aren’t just serving the top students in the district, who would already be on a college track. Some of them target students considered at risk of dropping out, making college both attainable and affordable for students who otherwise would not attend.…Read More

These districts score better than the rest

New achievement results highlight top-performing urban districts

districts-school-urban According to new results from a report measuring student achievement progress in math and reading in U.S. urban school districts, two districts are at the top of their game; however, much progress needs to be made for urban districts across the country.

The results are part of The Nation’s Report Card, which began measuring progress in urban schools districts 10 years ago. The 2013 Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in math and reading reports the achievement of public schools students in 21 urban districts on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

District participation is voluntary, and every district invited agreed to participate. The report shows achievement results in both fourth and eighth grades.…Read More

What makes a successful urban principal?

PBS Newshour discusses training and retaining great principals in struggling urban schools

principal-urban“Urban schools often face great challenges, low test scores and high dropout rates,” according to a recent PBS Newshour segment. But just as schools are trying to create 21st century learners, can education programs create the perfect urban school principal—leading to better test scores and higher graduation rates?

According to Ernesto Matias, high school principal at Wells Community Academy in Chicago, Ill., principals can be trained for urban school environments and issues specific to urban schools.

Wells, which Matias explained experienced a student walk-out last year (2012) and fired four teachers, began to stand for “We Educate Low-Life Students.” For the past 16 years, Wells failed to meet basic academic standards for test scores.…Read More