3M Young Scientist Challenge Announces 2022 National Finalists and Honorable Mentions

Today’s youth has never been more hopeful for a better, brighter, and safer world. Inspired by the desire to impact change in communities far and near, they are using the power of STEM to help drive the change they want to see. 3M ( @3M) and Discovery Education ( @DiscoveryEd) are proud to announce the top 10 finalists and four honorable mention recipients in the 2022 3M Young Scientist Challenge, the 15th year of the competition. 

This year’s finalists and honorable mention recipients feature outstanding innovations from young scientists – fourteen students ages 12 to 14 – who submitted a one-to two-minute video communicating a solution to an everyday problem in their community or the world and the science behind their solution. A diverse group of judges, including 3M scientists and leaders in education from across the country, evaluated entries based on creativity, scientific knowledge, and communication effectiveness. The final event will take place on October 17-18, 2022, at the 3M Innovation Center in Minneapolis.  

“At 3M, we are committed to unlocking the power of our people, science, and ideas to reimagine what comes next. The ‘3M Young Scientist Challenge’ supports young innovators who have demonstrated that same passion through creative discovery and the desire to improve the world around us,” said Karina Chavez, senior vice president and chief strategy officer at 3M. “We are thrilled to welcome the latest generation of finalists and honorable mention recipients, and we are energized by a future that embraces STEM-for-all to build a better tomorrow.” …Read More

How to ensure digital equity in online testing

The SAT will be moving online for students in the United States beginning in 2024. The State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam will be taken entirely online next year. Many other states already have fully online tests—and in response to the pandemic, graduate entrance and career certification exams have shifted online as well.

But as more high-stakes exams transition to an all-digital format, experts warn that students who are not as digitally literate as their peers could be placed at a disadvantage. As the trend toward wholly online testing continues, education leaders must consider how to ensure digital equity for the students taking these exams.

A study published in 2019 by Ben Backes and James Cowan from the nonprofit, nonpartisan American Institutes for Research found that students who took the Massachusetts state exam online performed worse, on average, than students of similar abilities who took the same test on paper. The difference was less dramatic for second-time test-takers, suggesting that familiarity with the digital format played a key role in the discrepancy.…Read More

ISTELive 22 wrap-up!

In this episode of Innovations in Education, host Kevin Hogan explores:

  • How esports and gamification have advanced classroom instruction and homework
  • Has AR/VR finally come of age?
  • Will empathy for students AND teachers remain once normality returns?

6 tips to begin an elementary esports program in your school

The benefits of esports are well documented. A significant body of research has found that students who participate in scholastic esports programs benefit from increased emotional regulation, academic achievement, and graduation rates.

These benefits only scratch the surface of the positive consequences for students participating in scholastic esports. Thus far, conversations around esports have centered on collegiate and secondary levels, however, a recent change in the winds has shifted the conversation to elementary esports. 

My question: Why haven’t we started this conversation sooner?…Read More

Phenix City Teacher Wins Marbury Technology Innovation Award

Phenix City, AL— Last week Central High School teacher, Tim Loreman was recognized as an exemplary educator in technology. He received the 19th Annual Marbury Technology Innovation Award from the State Superintendent of Education, Dr. Eric G. Mackey. 

Loreman is the television production teacher who instructs students on writing, capturing, and producing television programs. His classes regularly produce episodes of RDTV, Central High School’s news channel. Students also produce ASHAA’s coverage of the Red Devil Football Team and Softball Team. Students are given the opportunity to gain experience in planning and filming system commercials that aired on WTVM for the 2021-2022 school year.

“When I was first hired I was given the charge to bring Central High School to the forefront of the state in video production, social media, and sports broadcasting. My students have outdone themselves over the past four years and proving their capabilities in this field. Any honor I receive is a direct result of their hard work and dedication,” said Loreman.…Read More

Can your schools keep pace with student mental health demands?

Even before the pandemic, a third of U.S. students struggled with anxiety, depression, trauma, or attention issues that made it difficult to focus, stay motivated, and learn. That number has grown exponentially during the pandemic and recovery: now half of students feel persistently sad or hopeless. This is an urgent need that schools can no longer ignore.

Why? Coping with mental health concerns negatively impacts young people’s ability to meet the many demands of school—from learning, to interacting with peers, to maintaining energy and stamina through the physical demands of the day. Early intervention is critical, or else these students can spiral quickly into avoidance and loss of motivation. This impacts grades, attendance, discipline, and referrals to special education.

Even pre-pandemic, 50 percent or fewer of children and adolescents with a mental health disorder had received services in the previous 12 months. That number is certainly higher today. And yet, many schools have struggled to implement anything beyond Tier 1 interventions, which are simply mental health-related activities designed to meet the needs of all students regardless of whether or not they are at risk for mental health problems.…Read More

How age-appropriate tech inspires preschoolers (and their teachers)

At Brooklyn Preschool of Science, I’ve been using robots to make computational learning fun in my 4-year-old rooms for years.

When I decided to add computational learning to the 3-year-old group, I didn’t want teachers to always be the ones handling the robots. I wanted the kids to have the ability to control the robots on their own, even though 3-year-olds don’t have the same fine motor capabilities that my older students do.

Here’s how I use robots and other kid-friendly technology to give all my students an outlet for free exploration.…Read More

Lexia Learning’s Founder, Robert Arthur Lemire, Dies at Eighty-Nine

BOSTON (June 23, 2022) Lexia® Learning, a Cambium Learning® Group company, is saddened to announce that the company’s founder, Robert A. Lemire died on Wednesday, June 8, 2022. Lemire was eighty-nine and passed away following a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Lemire created Lexia Learning in 1984 after watching his son struggle to learn to read. Lemire received guidance from his friend, Dr. Edwin Cole, a noted neurologist, head of the Reading Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the founder of several schools for students with dyslexia like his son. Lemire realized that many other children had reading difficulties and most of them did not have the resources that his family did.

Together with neighbor Dr. Littleton Meeks, an expert in technology, Lemire and Dr. Cole decided to create a company that would use computer technology to help students receive the explicit, systematic, and personalized instruction they needed to become successful readers and confident learners. In 1992, Lexia expanded its mission to serve not only readers with dyslexia but all readers from beginners and inclusive of struggling readers. Today, the company serves more than 5.5 million students across more than 3,300 school districts in all 50 states and territories.…Read More