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A state-by-state look at top ed-tech initiatives

A state-by-state look at top ed-tech initiatives

What initiative are you most proud of in your state?

tech-initiativeSometimes, an ed-tech initiative grabs national headlines. Other times, a technology initiative quietly spreads throughout a school building or district as it connects teachers with mentors, helps administrators become more efficient, or boosts student achievement and engagement.

Here, we’ve compiled a list of one ed-tech initiative in each state and the District of Columbia, to offer a look at some of the great technology advocacy and work being done around the nation.

The initiatives included here are not necessarily the most-discussed or the biggest in a given state. Sometimes they’re small, and sometimes they’re well-known. Some relate to the use of digital content, some support broadband expansion, and in others, states have formed groups to better support administrators and teachers as they work tirelessly to advocate for ed-tech’s crucial role in today’s classrooms.

But each initiative, resource, or program, no matter the size of its scope, is a promising ed-tech practice that serves to demonstrate just how powerful ed-tech is.

We chose only one initiative per state, and we welcome your additional input. Is your state, district, or school launching or running a great ed-tech initiative? Don’t hesitate to let us know in the comments below.

Quick navigation:
States A-I
States K-N
States O-W

[Listed alphabetically, by state]

Alabama: First introduced in 2002, the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) expands teachers’ access to professional development, in-school support, and important technology. The two-year AMSTI program focuses on boosting student achievement through teacher strategies involving hands-on, inquiry-based instruction. Technology to deliver this instruction plays an important role. A study that took place in five separate parts of the state, Evaluation of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative, evaluated 82 schools, 780 teachers, and 30,000 students to determine the program’s effects on student achievement.
Overall, AMSTI teachers and students have access to more than $68 million worth of equipment and materials. This includes high-tech devices such as DNA replicators, SPARK Science Learning Systems, and more, at the high school level.

(Next page: More state successes)

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Comments:

  1. chriscalumet

    September 16, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    our district, Public Schools of CLK in Calumet, Michigan has had a 4-12 grade iPad initiative for 3 years for all students to have an iPad, and this year we began a Virtual High School for students in remote or rural areas of our state.
    we’re also in the process of publishing our first iBook textbook for Algebra, with more to come.

  2. Norb

    September 16, 2013 at 10:15 pm

    Why would Illinois invest $3.5 million for 200 students when fully operational. Is this a waste of money or did you mis-speak?
    Indiana is still the weak sister in all of this!

  3. somali

    September 17, 2013 at 11:40 am

    technology integration in the classroom can develop a modern education system.

  4. karminio

    September 20, 2013 at 3:43 pm

    It’s nice to see NYC’s Innovation Zone highlighted. I have heard wonerful things about this initiative. My question or comment is- what about the rest of the state? It seems to me that most districts continue to struggle with providing just the basics, never mind expensive technology initiatives. Technology private industries- how about sharing a little of the profits to invest in the future?