FEV Tutor Named Winner of the Inaugural 2021 Supes’ Choice Award for Virtual Instruction Experience

WOBURN, Mass. – Dec. 16, 2021 –  FEV Tutor was selected as an inaugural 2021 Supes’ Choice Awards winner in the Virtual Instructional Experience category. The awards were presented by the Institute for Education Innovation (IEI), an organization that serves as the bridge between district leaders and organizations to support the greatest challenges in K-12 education.

FEV Tutor was selected by a panel of esteemed superintendent judges from across the nation. Their assessment was based on FEV Tutor’s commitment to student outcomes, innovation and ingenuity, client support, interactivity, and engagement. The Supes’ Choice Awards are the only industry awards judged exclusively by school district superintendents.

“We are honored to be recognized by the Supes’ Choice Awards as the inaugural winner in the virtual instruction experience category for our commitment to high-impact online tutoring,” said Ryan Patenaude, Sr. Vice President and Co-Founder of FEV Tutor. “This recognition by district leaders serves as a testament to our decade-long dedication to best-in-results-driven support for the students we serve. We provide continuous data-driven individualized learning plans with designated tutors; 24/7 homework and coursework support as well as test prep tutoring to effect positive change for priority students.”…Read More

5 Big Ideas for Education Innovation in 2019

Over the last year, education innovators around the country continued to pursue expanded definitions of student success, personalized approaches, and wholly new models of school. For many, the very real challenges of change management and discovering ways to promote scale with quality dominated 2018. But for those conversations to go a level deeper, we can’t assume that these new measures and new models are fully baked or that everything deemed “new” is at it seems. Looking ahead, here are five big ideas I’ll be watching for in 2019:

1. ‘Unbundle’ what we mean by SEL.
Social-emotional learning. Soft Skills. Habits of mind. These critical but sometimes elusive ideas have gotten their fair share of love over the past year. But pulling back the curtain on the research base, the paltry supply of reliable SEL assessments can make the current energy around SEL interventions feel anemic at best, and hollow at worst. Like personalized learning, “SEL” now connotes a bundle of concepts and aspirations that may need to get unbundled in order to be useful. In that vein, in 2019 I’m most excited to watch emerging SEL point solutions targeted at specific, narrow skills or dispositions. These innovations are focused on doing a few things really well. For example, GiveThx, the brainchild of Leadership Public Schools’ teacher-entrepreneur Mike Fauteaux, plucks off one particular emotion and skill: gratitude. In a similar vein, Kind Foundation’s effort, Empatico.org, focuses on experiences that inspire empathy across classrooms. I’ll be watching models like these that offer narrower on-ramps to more rigorous measurement and targeted interventions within the exceedingly broad SEL landscape.

2. Commit to threading the coherent curriculum needle.
Speaking of the murky waters of personalized learning, rumblings (and occasional shouts) about the fragmented state of curriculum to support personalization have been building for years. One of the fundamental tensions we hear articulated is whether a coherent, evidence-based, off-the-shelf curriculum is better than a potpourri of lessons that teachers and leaders assemble—and in some cases build—themselves. Although these debates are not unique to personalized environments, personalization hinges on a commitment to tailor learning experiences to individual students. But the more varied those experiences and resources are, many worry the less rigorous and coherent curriculum becomes. Through the lens of our own Modularity theory, these tradeoffs aren’t unique to curriculum per se: across industries, a modular approach can be more affordable and flexible, while integrated solutions are pricier but better at pushing the frontier of performance. In 2019, I’ll be keeping an eye on how districts and schools manage to strike a balance between the tradeoffs of modular and flexible versus integrated and coherent approaches to curriculum.…Read More

7 reasons why we need innovation in schools

Innovation is more than a buzzword today—it’s something educators strive for in their classrooms, schools, and districts.

We can’t test students on their innovation, but we can encourage them to explore new concepts, look at challenges from all sides, and embrace failures as opportunities to try again with more knowledge.

We also want to make sure you know about our Distinguished Innovator Awards program, which recognizes educators, leaders, schools, and districts that are embracing personalized learning, closing equity and opportunity gaps, and using groundbreaking strategies to improve education in every classroom. If you have a minute, enter the contest or nominate a colleague! The contest is open until November 30.…Read More

Nominations open for The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education

The nomination window is open for the 2017 Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education, which honors innovation and has become one of the most prestigious educational awards since its founding in 1988. The Prize is administered through an alliance between McGraw-Hill Education and Arizona State University, which began in 2015.

The public will have the opportunity to submit nominations by visiting McGrawPrize.com until October 31st, 2016. The 2017 Prize winners will be featured at and join in an evening reception during the ASU GSV Education Innovation Summit in Salt Lake City, Utah, on May 8-10, 2017.

The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education annually recognizes outstanding individuals who have dedicated themselves to improving education through new approaches and whose accomplishments are making a difference today. The Prize includes three categories: U.S. K-12 and higher education, and international education. Honorees receive an award of $50,000 and a bronze sculpture designed by students from ASU.…Read More

Why is innovation so often synonymous with disappointment?

The Harvard Business Review reports: Because a pure idea is a beautiful thing, and seeing it get mauled as it struggles to become something real can be highly disappointing. It’s painful to see your “bridge to the moon” end up as a mere woodshed. Welcome to HBR’s new Insight Center: Beyond the Breakthrough: Executing on Innovation. This four-week series addresses the reality problem that always besets great ideas, and our thesis in curating it is that reality isn’t a problem — or at least it doesn’t have to be. We believe that reality too can be a beautiful thing, although, granted, it’s more of an acquired taste. We’ll take a close look at the execution aspects of innovation. In other words, you’ve birthed the breakthrough idea — now what? How do you nurture it, raise it, put it on its own two feet? How do you make sure it has an impact on the world? We’ll draw on a range of writers with a range of insights…

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What we can learn from a dinner controversy in the desert

A few weeks back, I had the honor to emcee the closing awards dinner at the Education Innovation Summit in Scottsdale, Michael Horn reports on Forbes.com.  The evening took a sour note though as the dinner keynote, which Andy Kessler delivered, stunned and offended the majority of the audience by essentially arguing that as digital learning rises, we won’t need teachers anymore. The audience took to Twitter to voice vehement disagreement, and my co-emcee and I—we were just as surprised as everyone else—did our best to distance ourselves from the remarks and hit the reset button on the evening…

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New round of grants target education innovation

Applications for the second round of i3 grants are due Aug. 2, and grants will be awarded by the end of this year.

The federal government is trying to make it easier to apply for one of its grants for innovative ideas to improve education. But with budget cuts, there’s a lot less money to give away this year.

In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) gave out $650 million to 49 school districts, charter organization, colleges, universities, and other nonprofit organizations with entrepreneurial ideas for improving the nation’s schools. On June 3, ED announced that there’s $150 million available for the second round of Investing in Innovation, or i3, grants this year.…Read More

Experts: Use national budget crisis as an opportunity

The keynoters took the stage to share what they thought ed-tech leaders should hear to get them through their own troubling times.

In the opening session for the Consortium for School Networking’s annual conference, held this year in New Orleans, the theme was “Mastering the Moment,” which referred to the country’s current budget crisis.

Starting with tables of coffee and muffins, a few hundred or so attendees settled in to glean tidbits of information from four experts in educational technology.  With the intimate setting and small prominent stage, it seemed as though the session was less glitz and glam, and more get-down-to-business.…Read More

Forum explores how to spur school innovation

Panelists at a recent forum focused on how to encourage more innovation in education.

Innovation was a key theme of President Obama’s State of the Union address on Jan. 25, and it also was the theme of a recent forum in Washington, D.C., that explored how policy makers and education leaders can encourage more innovation in the nation’s schools.

Hosted by the Aspen Institute, the Education Innovation Forum kicked off Jan. 20 with Education Secretary Arne Duncan calling on states to implement the Common Core standards and integrate more technology into classrooms.…Read More

Feds turn to ‘crowdsourcing’ for educational innovation

Since the portal opened in February, 4,000 people have already signed up.
Since the Open Innovation Portal opened in February, more than 4,000 people have signed up.

Education technology advocates hope that a new national online community will inspire entrepreneurs and educators to team up in developing and funding innovative solutions to some of education’s most persistent challenges.

The Open Innovation Portal, launched by the U.S. Education Department (ED) with help from IBM’s cloud-computing solutions and Spencer Trask Collaborative Innovations (STCI), aims to address educational challenges ranging from high school dropout rates to low reading, math, and science scores.…Read More